Amanda de Cadenet - The Conversation - http://www.theconversation.tv/show/
http://www.sidereel.com/gallery_girls
http://www.pirateshows.net/gallery-girls-season-1-episode-1-all-tomorrows-parties/

http://www.sidereel.com/the_only_way_is_essex
http://icrazeepisodes.info/sex-and-the-city-season-1-episode-05-the-power-of-female-sex/
http://api.ning.com/files/FyJow1OZVnJ0lvIrDz3OLnpAttlgmAqu-1dId-qRe1pOwascnUlhlOJsdBQchbHI3E6O3nHPkIKW1PhWT21ZOQSKrPnR9y9a/WAL_FurZwei.jpg
http://www.diacenter.org/exhibitions/pressrelease/109
http://www.judychicago.com/educator/timeline.php
http://www.astudiooftheirown.org/legacy.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01m495b/Womans_Hour_Weekend_Womans_Hour_PostNatal_Psychosis 
http://www.takeabreak.co.uk/
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/aug/27/pussy-riot-interview-yekaterina-samutsevich?newsfeed=true
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njWwegLURCg

http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/index.htm 
http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/feminists-pioneer-conversation-radio
http://archiv.fridericianum-kassel.de/kunsthalle_bisher.html
http://www.wdw.nl/event/prompts-triggers-surplus-authors/
http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/821187/brooklyn-museums-latest-crowd-curated-show-tells-visitors-to-move-beyond-the-like-button
http://www.gobrooklynart.org/
http://projectanywhere.net/about
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~carlos/607/readings/bakhtin.pdf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mGS__7jW9M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4nMZRRT7ZI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=fvwp&v=Mo0jvJeDPms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjjIs1FttfE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_tACz7-Mg&feature=related
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1g33PwAACAAJ&dq=situation+claire+doherty&source=bl&ots=KOAwM5YyqR&sig=LtdQxsRhMO3qmRU6hSuR2vOZjN4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2jo_UPLCGbGN0wWn9IFA&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAQ
http://www.unc.edu/courses/2006spring/geog/021/001/massey.pdf
http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp/91st/91st_Archive/vol4_n1/pdfs/trivedi.pdf
http://www.chairlifted.com/metbefore/
http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/ball_hugo/Ball-Hugo_Karawane-Trio-Ex-Voco.mp3
http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/normalization-2/
http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/65633.html
http://www.gilbert-garcin.com/chrono/photos/photo_2008_357.php

Amanda de Cadenet - The Conversation - http://www.theconversation.tv/show/

http://www.sidereel.com/gallery_girls

http://www.pirateshows.net/gallery-girls-season-1-episode-1-all-tomorrows-parties/

http://www.sidereel.com/the_only_way_is_essex

http://icrazeepisodes.info/sex-and-the-city-season-1-episode-05-the-power-of-female-sex/

http://api.ning.com/files/FyJow1OZVnJ0lvIrDz3OLnpAttlgmAqu-1dId-qRe1pOwascnUlhlOJsdBQchbHI3E6O3nHPkIKW1PhWT21ZOQSKrPnR9y9a/WAL_FurZwei.jpg

http://www.diacenter.org/exhibitions/pressrelease/109

http://www.judychicago.com/educator/timeline.php

http://www.astudiooftheirown.org/legacy.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01m495b/Womans_Hour_Weekend_Womans_Hour_PostNatal_Psychosis 

http://www.takeabreak.co.uk/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/aug/27/pussy-riot-interview-yekaterina-samutsevich?newsfeed=true

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njWwegLURCg

http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/index.htm 

http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/feminists-pioneer-conversation-radio

http://archiv.fridericianum-kassel.de/kunsthalle_bisher.html

http://www.wdw.nl/event/prompts-triggers-surplus-authors/

http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/821187/brooklyn-museums-latest-crowd-curated-show-tells-visitors-to-move-beyond-the-like-button

http://www.gobrooklynart.org/

http://projectanywhere.net/about

http://www.public.iastate.edu/~carlos/607/readings/bakhtin.pdf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mGS__7jW9M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4nMZRRT7ZI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=fvwp&v=Mo0jvJeDPms

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjjIs1FttfE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_tACz7-Mg&feature=related

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1g33PwAACAAJ&dq=situation+claire+doherty&source=bl&ots=KOAwM5YyqR&sig=LtdQxsRhMO3qmRU6hSuR2vOZjN4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2jo_UPLCGbGN0wWn9IFA&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAQ

http://www.unc.edu/courses/2006spring/geog/021/001/massey.pdf

http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp/91st/91st_Archive/vol4_n1/pdfs/trivedi.pdf

http://www.chairlifted.com/metbefore/

http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/ball_hugo/Ball-Hugo_Karawane-Trio-Ex-Voco.mp3

http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/normalization-2/

http://www.gilbert-garcin.com/chrono/photos/photo_2008_357.php

20//20 present: Aegis.
Aegis is an exploration of what is important to protect in the changing landscape of Shoreditch and its environs. Participatory pieces by a photographer, sound artist and textile artists collaborated on a multimedia psycho-geographic map of the potential future of the area. 
In the future, we hope the project will culminate in a subversive alternative to a corporate-style development launch; a refreshing antidote to those that advertise the apparently wholly positive effects of Olympic-style re-generation.
Soosan Lolavar // Yuli Levtov
This collaborative piece by electronic composer Soosan and sound engineer Yuli, explores the unique characteristics of the East End. Together they have constructed an interactive sonic map that captures fleeting moments of the sonic landscape in the area. These sounds are combined with images of recording locations forming ‘sonic postcards’ that psycho-geographically map the area.
Find out more about Soosan’s work at www.soosanlolavar.com and Yuli’s work at http://flavors.me/ylevtov
Rosie Carr // Meghan Heinl-Rimmer
Taking the concept of the aegis in literal terms, contemporary artists Rosie and Meghan have produced a piece from scraps of found material. The work lies somewhere between a protest banner and protective cloak, a symbolic shield responding to the history of the textile industry in Shoreditch, and its demise. Throughout the weekend members of the public are invited to add their own contribution. The result will be a completely collaborative one off ‘commodity’ that cannot be purchased- a contrast to the commercial character of Box Park.
Elizabeth Bicher
Each image documents photographer Bicher’s reaction to 20//20 Collective’s call to protect, displaying her personal East End. To produce these photographs she travelled around East London documenting three categories – a mode of transport, a public space and a building, often giving the viewer a chance to see interiors and exteriors, or different viewpoints.
Bicher invites you to participate in this photographic conversation by taking your own photographs of a mode of transport, a public space and a building using your camera of choice. These can be emailed to 20//20 Collective’s Flickr on end85making@photos.flickr.com, where they will be displayed in Boxpark and documented as part of the Aegis project.
Aegis took place as a part of Uncontained on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd June at 55DSL Store, Boxpark, 2-4 , Bethnal Green Rd, Shoreditch, London E1 6GY.

20//20 present: Aegis.

Aegis is an exploration of what is important to protect in the changing landscape of Shoreditch and its environs. Participatory pieces by a photographer, sound artist and textile artists collaborated on a multimedia psycho-geographic map of the potential future of the area.

In the future, we hope the project will culminate in a subversive alternative to a corporate-style development launch; a refreshing antidote to those that advertise the apparently wholly positive effects of Olympic-style re-generation.

Soosan Lolavar // Yuli Levtov

This collaborative piece by electronic composer Soosan and sound engineer Yuli, explores the unique characteristics of the East End. Together they have constructed an interactive sonic map that captures fleeting moments of the sonic landscape in the area. These sounds are combined with images of recording locations forming ‘sonic postcards’ that psycho-geographically map the area.

Find out more about Soosan’s work at www.soosanlolavar.com and Yuli’s work at http://flavors.me/ylevtov

Rosie Carr // Meghan Heinl-Rimmer

Taking the concept of the aegis in literal terms, contemporary artists Rosie and Meghan have produced a piece from scraps of found material. The work lies somewhere between a protest banner and protective cloak, a symbolic shield responding to the history of the textile industry in Shoreditch, and its demise. Throughout the weekend members of the public are invited to add their own contribution. The result will be a completely collaborative one off ‘commodity’ that cannot be purchased- a contrast to the commercial character of Box Park.

Elizabeth Bicher

Each image documents photographer Bicher’s reaction to 20//20 Collective’s call to protect, displaying her personal East End. To produce these photographs she travelled around East London documenting three categories – a mode of transport, a public space and a building, often giving the viewer a chance to see interiors and exteriors, or different viewpoints.

Bicher invites you to participate in this photographic conversation by taking your own photographs of a mode of transport, a public space and a building using your camera of choice. These can be emailed to 20//20 Collective’s Flickr on end85making@photos.flickr.com, where they will be displayed in Boxpark and documented as part of the Aegis project.

Aegis took place as a part of Uncontained on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd June at 55DSL Store, Boxpark, 2-4 , Bethnal Green Rd, Shoreditch, London E1 6GY.



As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.
- Tooting recycling project
- Interesting film about art in public places from 1951. An art exhibition in a pub in Tooting! Really great film!
- Film about Butchers’ college… another great one!
- comedy about the office…
- how to be the ‘laziest and still get paid’
- The Office motivational speech…
- art and protest?
- Documentary about pirate radio stations in London
- Video about how to make a radio
- Miles, Malcolm (1997) Art, Space and the City. Public Art and Urban Futures, London: Routledge.
- Boris Groys: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/marx-after-duchamp-or-the-artist’s-two-bodies/
- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2118147/BUDGET-2012-summary-Public-sector-workers-north-paid-less.html?ito=feeds-newsxml
- http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/the-staggers/2012/03/politicians-money-work-society
- http://www.marxists.org/archive/morris/works/1884/art-lab.htm
- http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/sixth-london-conference/sessions-and-paper-abstracts/0068.txt
- Manual labour : engaging with contemporary art through collaborative activity / [artist, Jon Lockhart ; texts by Nicolas de Oliveira … [et al.] ; edited by Erica Burton and Sarah Mossop.]. 
- Work and the image : 1. Work, craft and labour : visual representations in changing histories ; 2. Work in modern times : visual mediations and social processes / edited by 
- Reuse value : spolia and appropriation in art and architecture, from Constantine to Sherrie Levine / edited by Richard Brilliant and Dale Kinney.
- The ‘do-it-yourself’ artwork : participation from fluxus to new media / edited by Anna Dezeuze.
- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2053546/Lazy-workers-sacked-explanation-government-told.html
- http://liberalconspiracy.org/2012/02/18/laziness-levels-in-britain-getting-lazier-wails-government/


Lucia Stamati

- http://www.workandplayscrapstore.org.uk/home/
- http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/found-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-aldrich-contemporary-art-museum/
- http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2010/04/05/100-years-a-history-of-performance-art 
- http://www.e-flux.com/program/allan-sekula-this-ain’t-china/
- http://www.variant.org.uk/events/art+labour/Art+Labour.html
- Dada and the found object






Work by Koki Tanaka - interesting point of reference for Mette Hammer Juhl’s work ‘It’s not as good as I expected it to be’: Koki Tanaka, Buckets and Balls, 2005. See also skateboarding videos….
Vlada Maria, ’Anything for any price’
Vlada Maria asked us to produce a text about her work for the AGORA publication:
Trading her number in for a pig’s head to take pride of place on a marble slab. A slab on a slab.
‘Anything for any price!’, ‘Anything for any price – I make special price for you!’
Everything on the cart is rubbish. A gentleman wants to make a purchase but she’s not sure she can part with it – she’ll let him know later, and make him a special price.
‘Are you scared?’ 
‘Do you need anything? Anything for any price.’
She has everything on the cart. Everything? Everything. 
Would you like to buy something? Come on – have this present. It’s just a present – a flower for your girlfriend or mother? They’re only £1. 
What has she got? Anything. A pig’s head. Everything. She has a cart of presents for exchange – nothing at all is really free. 
 
 
The end result is £5.20 in cash and some sugar and a pig’s head – successful sales pitches.

As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.

Tooting recycling project

Interesting film about art in public places from 1951. An art exhibition in a pub in Tooting! Really great film!

Film about Butchers’ college… another great one!

comedy about the office…

how to be the ‘laziest and still get paid’

The Office motivational speech…

art and protest?

Documentary about pirate radio stations in London

- Video about how to make a radio

- Miles, Malcolm (1997) Art, Space and the City. Public Art and Urban Futures, London: Routledge.

- Boris Groys: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/marx-after-duchamp-or-the-artist’s-two-bodies/

- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2118147/BUDGET-2012-summary-Public-sector-workers-north-paid-less.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

- http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/the-staggers/2012/03/politicians-money-work-society

- http://www.marxists.org/archive/morris/works/1884/art-lab.htm

- http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/sixth-london-conference/sessions-and-paper-abstracts/0068.txt

- Manual labour : engaging with contemporary art through collaborative activity / [artist, Jon Lockhart ; texts by Nicolas de Oliveira … [et al.] ; edited by Erica Burton and Sarah Mossop.]. 

- Work and the image : 1. Work, craft and labour : visual representations in changing histories ; 2. Work in modern times : visual mediations and social processes / edited by 

- Reuse value : spolia and appropriation in art and architecture, from Constantine to Sherrie Levine / edited by Richard Brilliant and Dale Kinney.

- The ‘do-it-yourself’ artwork : participation from fluxus to new media / edited by Anna Dezeuze.

- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2053546/Lazy-workers-sacked-explanation-government-told.html

- http://liberalconspiracy.org/2012/02/18/laziness-levels-in-britain-getting-lazier-wails-government/

Lucia Stamati

- http://www.workandplayscrapstore.org.uk/home/

- http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/found-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-aldrich-contemporary-art-museum/

- http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2010/04/05/100-years-a-history-of-performance-art 

- http://www.e-flux.com/program/allan-sekula-this-ain’t-china/

- http://www.variant.org.uk/events/art+labour/Art+Labour.html

- Dada and the found object

Work by Koki Tanaka - interesting point of reference for Mette Hammer Juhl’s work ‘It’s not as good as I expected it to be’: Koki Tanaka, Buckets and Balls, 2005. See also skateboarding videos….

Vlada Maria, ’Anything for any price’

Vlada Maria asked us to produce a text about her work for the AGORA publication:

Trading her number in for a pig’s head to take pride of place on a marble slab. A slab on a slab.

‘Anything for any price!’, ‘Anything for any price – I make special price for you!’

Everything on the cart is rubbish. A gentleman wants to make a purchase but she’s not sure she can part with it – she’ll let him know later, and make him a special price.

‘Are you scared?’

‘Do you need anything? Anything for any price.’

She has everything on the cart. Everything? Everything.

Would you like to buy something? Come on – have this present. It’s just a present – a flower for your girlfriend or mother? They’re only £1.

What has she got? Anything. A pig’s head. Everything. She has a cart of presents for exchange – nothing at all is really free.

 

 

The end result is £5.20 in cash and some sugar and a pig’s head – successful sales pitches.

archLIVE #1: 16/03/12
As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.
Preliminary materials:
- David Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, 2008
- Nina Powers, One Dimensional Woman, 2011
- Linda Nochlin Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays
- Taschen’s Women Artists
- Kristen Frederickson Singular Women: Writing the Artist… 
- Charles Leadbeater, The Art of With
- Sampling tracker
- DJ Shadows Album
- Psychogeography Tooting
- Sound Artists
- Beyonce, Year of 4
- Sex and the City - Careers
- Pussy Cat Club
- Doll’s House - Bella the Welder
- Women at Work: The Lesser Half
-  Kurt Vonnegut on Short Stories
- The New School, Women
- Meiro Koizumi
- Tooting Dancing Man
- Russian minimalist poets who use snippets of overheard conversation to create poetry
- Doug Aitken’s sound experiments
- Hayley Lock’s soundcloud
- On Kawara’s telegrams/letters
- Shilpa Gupta
- Harun Farocki 
- lecture by Maurice Benayoun
- Community Arts Lecture
- Participation in the Arts Lecture
- Dear X
- XX Chromosocial Women
- Astronauts of Inner Space
Discussion #1








Questions for Emma Sywyj


Emma Sywyj - Conversation





Robin Baker-Gibbs - Conversation




Oscar Cass-Darweish Conversation

Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs Conversation

]]>

archLIVE #1: 16/03/12

As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.

Preliminary materials:

- David Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, 2008

- Nina Powers, One Dimensional Woman, 2011

- Linda Nochlin Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays

- Taschen’s Women Artists

- Kristen Frederickson Singular Women: Writing the Artist… 

- Charles Leadbeater, The Art of With

Sampling tracker

DJ Shadows Album

Psychogeography Tooting

Sound Artists

Beyonce, Year of 4

- Sex and the City - Careers

Pussy Cat Club

Doll’s House - Bella the Welder

Women at Work: The Lesser Half

-  Kurt Vonnegut on Short Stories

The New School, Women

Meiro Koizumi

Tooting Dancing Man

- Russian minimalist poets who use snippets of overheard conversation to create poetry

- Doug Aitken’s sound experiments

- Hayley Lock’s soundcloud

- On Kawara’s telegrams/letters

- Shilpa Gupta

- Harun Farocki 

lecture by Maurice Benayoun

Community Arts Lecture

Participation in the Arts Lecture

- Dear X

- XX Chromosocial Women

- Astronauts of Inner Space

Discussion #1

Questions for Emma Sywyj

Emma Sywyj - Conversation

Robin Baker-Gibbs - Conversation

Oscar Cass-Darweish Conversation

Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs Conversation

20//20 will be curating two days of AGORA at Tooting Market (12th-24th March 2012).
We will be working in the project space on Friday 16th March and Friday 23rd March.
Friday 16th artist collaborators:
- Emma Sywyj
- Oscar Cass-Darweish
- Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs
- Roseena Hussain

About AGORA:
11 days of experimentation and market testing based in Tooting Market, over 40 Graphic Designers, Artists, Writers, Filmakers, producers and Musicians collaborating towards the Project. Each day, the group will meet in the AGORA installed outside Brick Box, a series of discussions will take place before the individual projects, which will all negotiate a relationship between within the context of a market and the physicality of the space. The accumulation of which will see us launch the ‘AGORA PUBLICATION’ @ UNORTHABOX on the 24th March.
Find out more about the project at the AGORA website.

20//20 will be curating two days of AGORA at Tooting Market (12th-24th March 2012).

We will be working in the project space on Friday 16th March and Friday 23rd March.

Friday 16th artist collaborators:

- Emma Sywyj

- Oscar Cass-Darweish

- Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs

- Roseena Hussain

About AGORA:

11 days of experimentation and market testing based in Tooting Market, over 40 Graphic Designers, Artists, Writers, Filmakers, producers and Musicians collaborating towards the Project. Each day, the group will meet in the AGORA installed outside Brick Box, a series of discussions will take place before the individual projects, which will all negotiate a relationship between within the context of a market and the physicality of the space. The accumulation of which will see us launch the ‘AGORA PUBLICATION’ @ UNORTHABOX on the 24th March.

Find out more about the project at the AGORA website.

Rosie Carr - BGWMC
16mm film transferred to video - works best viewed with red/cyan filtered glasses.
A ‘3D’ movie shot entirely with an anaglyphic lens based on a design for a ‘lunch box lens’ (so called as it came apart and could be hidden neatly inside a plastic lunchbox) circulated amongst stereoscope enthusiasts in the 1980s.
This film was comissioned by 20//20 for the exhibition 20//20 @ BGWMC.
Sound in collaboration with Sam Mackay
With thanks to:
20//20 collective
BGWMC
Edward Nowill 
No.w.here film lab
Sam Ford

Rosie Carr - BGWMC

16mm film transferred to video - works best viewed with red/cyan filtered glasses.

A ‘3D’ movie shot entirely with an anaglyphic lens based on a design for a ‘lunch box lens’ (so called as it came apart and could be hidden neatly inside a plastic lunchbox) circulated amongst stereoscope enthusiasts in the 1980s.

This film was comissioned by 20//20 for the exhibition 20//20 @ BGWMC.

Sound in collaboration with Sam Mackay

With thanks to:

20//20 collective

BGWMC

Edward Nowill 

No.w.here film lab

Sam Ford


Image © James Pockson
20//20 @ BGWMC
03/11/2011 - 01/12/2011
20//20 @ BGWMC was an exhibition and lecture/events series staged at Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, London. Artists were invited to negotiate the space and history of the Club and produce work which directly responded to the location.
Download the exhibition catalogue HERE
— Performance programme —
Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn and his Orchestra - ‘Brown Swan’
The Three Englishmen 
John Murray  
— Lecture programme —
Alex Lifschutz - The Architecture of Community Centres
Sarah MacDougall - The Whitchapel Boys
Rachel Dickson and Emma Russell - Site-specific Commissions in Spitalfields
— Exhibiting artists —
Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn/Brenda Baxter/Jack Crisp/John Newton/Rose Rowson/MEF/Rosie Carr/James Pockson/Nash Francis/David Reynolds/Olivia Aspinall/Magdalena Strzelczak/Alex Trench

Image © James Pockson

20//20 @ BGWMC

03/11/2011 - 01/12/2011

20//20 @ BGWMC was an exhibition and lecture/events series staged at Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, London. Artists were invited to negotiate the space and history of the Club and produce work which directly responded to the location.

Download the exhibition catalogue HERE

— Performance programme —

Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn and his Orchestra - ‘Brown Swan’

The Three Englishmen 

John Murray  

— Lecture programme —

Alex Lifschutz - The Architecture of Community Centres

Sarah MacDougall - The Whitchapel Boys

Rachel Dickson and Emma Russell - Site-specific Commissions in Spitalfields

— Exhibiting artists —

Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn/Brenda Baxter/Jack Crisp/John Newton/Rose Rowson/MEF/Rosie Carr/James Pockson/Nash Francis/David Reynolds/Olivia Aspinall/Magdalena Strzelczak/Alex Trench

CLUB SINGER
MEF
Club Singer is a piece by MEF (Marianne Forrest in collaboration with Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn) commissioned by 20//20 as part of the 20//20 @ BGWMC project.  

The work is inspired by Youtube videos of club singers in venues like Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club around the country. Embracing the lo-fi aesthetic of the home video found in the club singers’ recordings and the vocal passion revealed in these amateur performances, MEF’s Club Singer celebrates the traditions of karaoke and its accompanying aesthetic.

CLUB SINGER

MEF

Club Singer is a piece by MEF (Marianne Forrest in collaboration with Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn) commissioned by 20//20 as part of the 20//20 @ BGWMC project.  

The work is inspired by Youtube videos of club singers in venues like Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club around the country. Embracing the lo-fi aesthetic of the home video found in the club singers’ recordings and the vocal passion revealed in these amateur performances, MEF’s Club Singer celebrates the traditions of karaoke and its accompanying aesthetic.

#6
SURVIVAL TACTICS OF AN ART WORLD
MEGHAN GOODEVE
At noon they made a fire, grilled bits of meat and made scrambled eggs. Terry had a famous receipe for scrambled eggs, so took off his coat and rolled up his sleeves and altogether was as portentous as an alchemist concocting the elixir of life.


Terry in triumph, always more like an occult alchemist than a mere cook, mysteriously brought off the ham and eggs. They ate rather rapidly and silently, inside the hay-loft in the almost-darkness. Stanley complained because he lost his slice of sausage. Then mysteriously they packed up and prepared for sleep. Terry of course course gave a brief exhibition of how to sleep in a hay-hut, in deep hay. One made a hole as deep as possible, and etc. etc. etc. and finally one was buried completely under three feet of hay.


And in the sunshine, with people going lazily, and women sitting in the street under their green umbrellas selling black grapes and white grapes, and pears and peaches, and the old pointed houses rearing above the narrow, sunny flagged street, and the great tower rearing up to look, like some burly but competent feudal baron, and the shadows falling so dark and the sun so very bright – why, it all had that unspeakable charm of the real old Germany, before science came, and the horrible German theorising. The lovely old Germany that roamed along, so individualistic and vigorous under its lords, but so careless, so deep with life force.


Photographs of Fulda Campsite, Kassel, with extracts from DH Lawrence’s Mr Noon, an unfinished novel set in Germany and written by Lawrence while in exile (1922). First published in1985. 
#5
PROCESS / / PROGRESS
LOTTE JOHNSON
A few months ago, I attended a discussion regarding the different “modalities” of translation that take place within the museum space, led by educator Amir Parsa. Among the numerous definitions of the term considered by Parsa, one particular strand of translation stood out to me, that performed by the curator for a public. One of the salient points that surfaced during the discussion was the selective action of curating, particularly taking place in large-scale institutions where often only works of the highest merit or from the strongest point in an artist’s career are shown. I began to think about different modes of practice, and how important (and stimulating) the early stages of an artist’s development can be. Further into this discussion, Parsa was joined by two publishers, to whom he proposed the significance and fruitfulness of exploring a work from a so-called “difficult” stage of a writer or artist’s career, a period of flux and evolution.
This proposal of exploring a work “in progress” resonated with some of my own recent thoughts, particularly in relation to the work of Tom Thayer, whose work I had seen in the Whitney Biennial in New York. Thayer himself occupied the third floor of the Whitney for two weekends, operating in the spaces where his works were displayed. The Whitney called his occupations “live performances”; to me, these afternoons were an insight into Thayer at work, engaging in a process of continual re-activation and regeneration of his own pieces. I felt as though I had stumbled into the artist’s studio, observing as Thayer moved swiftly around the space, adjusting a puppet’s flailing arms, moving a projector’s piercing beam of light, cutting and pasting pieces of paper to change the projected silhouette, pulling down a strange hanging box-construction to attach a string and then pluck at it. Another man (who I later learned was one of Thayer’s graduate students) assisted him. Acting as collaborative orchestrators, they periodically signalled to each other, exchanged materials, or communicated in low tones. It soon became impossible to distinguish separate pieces in the space, rather the body of work formed a sort of animated workshop, a collaborative whole.

Watching Thayer at work was like standing in the wings at the theatre, at once privy to the performance and its construction. His creations are multi-functional; each object that he has made is repurposed to provide the starting point or raw material for the next. Collages intended as backdrops for animations are framed on the wall, three-dimensional constructions become bizarre musical instruments. By animating his own work, he conjures abstract mythic narratives, but always leaves the skeleton of his work exposed. It seems there is no final piece. His holistic approach to his many mediums is striking, but ever more so when you watch him manipulating and activating these works in real time.
Lauren addressed related ideas in her previous blog post (see below), proposing the possibility of collaborative work in which the author’s “materials” are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, and the idea of making public the act of writing. Applying this idea to the work of practising visual artists could be equally invigorating, and Thayer provides an interesting model for the kind of expansive, evolving and transparent practice that I feel that 20//20 pursues as a curatorial collective.

#4
SOME THOUGHTS ON CURATING AND PERFORMANCE ART
RACHEL STRATTON
In late 1960’s New York, a new genre of art came into being- the performance. Defying traditional views of the artwork as a static, self contained entity; artists like Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys and Allan Kaprow began expressing themselves through durational ‘actions’ or ‘happenings’.
These physical interventions established a new relationship between artist and viewer whereby both parties were integral to the piece, each relying on the other to determine the outcome. In Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece, audience members were invited to pick up the scissors at will and snip away at the clothing on her body. No one had determined the outcome of the piece- who should volunteer or how much material to cut, so the thrill came from watching and assisting the development of the work from beginning to end.

Performance has since become central to contemporary art and has paved the way for the boom in New Media that pervades the visual arts today. Comparatively, the art of curating has developed at a more leisurely pace, only becoming subject to that same introspective, critical eye in the last decade or so.  Coming out of our recent ArchLIVE project for Agora, I want to apply the model of Performance art to the field of curating, looking at ways it can inform our understanding of the relation between 

(see Meghan’s blog entry #1)
In its traditional form the exhibition is a static entity that presents works of art in a singular narrative chosen by the curator. As the audience moves through the space, clues for interpreting the works are provided by the arrangement and any accompanying text. To consider it as a performance piece however would transform the exhibition into a dynamic environment, in which the narrative and interpretation of artworks are determined by the specific circumstances of the moment. The ArchLIVE project attempted this by continually looking to the outside world to find new ways of aiding interpretation. Each discussion held with an artist, member of the public or market seller yielded a different relationship with the artworks, all of which were noted and archived to offer people another “way in”.
In this way, the narrative of the exhibition evolves simultaneously to the audiences that pass through it, so the spectators have an impact on how the works are perceived. Rather than accepting a particular reading by one curator, they become aware of the plethora of interpretations to be made about any one artwork. The process of curating is laid bare, open for all to see, comment upon and critique. In the performance piece this primacy of “process” is key, as the audience witnesses the evolution from conception to actuality and often destruction in the course of the “happening”. Maria Abramovic, one of the original performance artists of the ‘70’s describes it thus,
“The performance you do in fixed time and in that fixed time you see the whole process and you see the disappearing of the process at the same moment and afterwards you don’t have anything, you have only the memory”
Might we not discover a different type of exhibition if we apply the same principles? Abramovic delights in the transitory nature of her work, without concern for her historic legacy. She celebrates the fact that the piece lives on only in the memories of those who witnessed it. To stage an exhibition in this way would prioritise the physical experience of being there and allow individuals to engage in a unique, highly personal dialogue that lives on through their perception of it.
I will finish with the nearest example I could think of to this form of exhibition. It comes, perhaps unsurprisingly, from Hans Ulrich Obrist. In his Do It project, he asked 168 artists to write out simple instructions for producing works of art, which he compiled in a book for general release. Since its conception in 1993, 40 different cities worldwide have staged this exhibition, each applying their own interpretation to the instructions and achieving different outcomes. To mark the twentieth anniversary of the project, Obrist is now bringing them all together in an archive of recorded information that will serve to highlight just how diverse different interpretations of the same thing can be. It puts the viewer in the position of both artist and curator, enabling them to play out their own understanding and add to the vast body of interpretations.
Obrist’s project is the first step along the way to a new type of curating that champions multiple interpretations and an active, critically engaged audience. Drawing parallels between performance and curating is just one way of exploring how we might take this further. The question then remains how to put these ideas into action and whether artists would consider it a conflict with their work?

#3
SOUND AND WOMEN - A MIX OF RESEARCH
MARIANNE FORREST
A lot of my 20//20 and personal research recently has been concerned with the portrayal of women and the ‘feminine’ in popular media. In particular I’ve been looking into how women are presented on film and radio, and how they use these formats to present themselves. I’ve pulled together some of the sources I’ve been working with, along with some more general popular culture references, into an audio mix with accompanying ‘sleeve notes’. All sources and further reading can be clicked-through to in the tracklist below.

1. Margaret Thatcher - 'The Lady's not for turning' speech delivered to the Conservative party conference in Brighton on October 10, 1980. With the release of ‘The Iron Lady’ last year suddenly conversations about whether Thatcher should be considered a feminist icon suddenly started up again. This Guardian comment piece has some views on that, along with a good dose of vitriol: And just to show that women can do anything men can do, she started a war, rode around on a tank in her headscarf, created loads more widows, thought herself terrifically grand and used the royal plural for her very own (Michelle Hanson).
2. Niko Karamyan - Meet Me at Bebe, BB (DIS Magazine) Every mall has them; meet the celebrity mallrats of LA’s famous gallerias. Post-Khardashian photo shoot of a certain type of LA femininity. Audio taken from accompanying mix by Napolian.
3. Brynn Brooks (dir.) - Women at Work, The Lesser Half (first broadcast on the BBC February 6, 1974). Taken from the BBC’s Second Wave Feminism archive, this discussion show investigates a selection of women’s attitudes towards work, the workplace and exploring ‘male’ jobs. The mix features other clips from this archive, which is interesting not only for hearing women speak during a period so instrumental in furthering women’s rights, but also to see how the traditional modes of BBC reporting deal with these stories (often with a certain amount of disdain).
4. Grimes - Oblivion Currently the darling of music and fashion industries alike, Grimes’ Claire Boucher Twitter vents her exasperation with the sex-over-substance media interest in her:

5. M.I.A. - Vikki Leekx (clip) Rob Horning writing for PopMatters highlighted M.I.A.’s struggles with privilege as part of how classic capitalist co-optation worked, making her vulnerable to anti-feminist and political character assassination, feeling that the profiler “sided at a deeper level with capitalism, marginalizing and dismissing M.I.A.’s efforts to embody the contradictions, as it were, as simple hypocrisy.” He continued “M.I.A. struggles obviously with being a sell-out” whereas the writer “has been a sell-out all along and now enforces for capitalism and the Establishment against those in the gray area. The same old story: character assassination and ad hominem attacks on the messenger” so that the message will be ignored or invalidated - (via Wikipedia) written in response to Lynn Hirschberg’s pretty damning New York Times profile of M.I.A. M.I.A. consensus often seems to be that she should be less political and more of a typical female popstar (advice here from The Vulture: 5. Keep shit-talking Lady Gaga. Remember when you said: “[My image is] not like ‘Haus of Gaga’ … Me blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples and shit”? That was hilarious! More outspokenness directed at self-serious pop stars, and less about how Google is spying on us, would be fantastic.
6. Pussy Cat Club - reported by Bob Langley for BBC in 1970. Now a completely ridiculous feature about the Pussy Cat Club, a group of women who actively opposed women’s liberation and demanded traditional male/female roles to be upheld. 
7. TLC - No Scrubs (DJ Copy remix) One of the most successful R+B groups of the ’90s and best-selling American female groups of all time. Nice example of ’90s vocalisations of ‘independent women’ But a scrub is checkin’ me, But his game is kinda weak, And I know that he cannot approach me, Cuz I’m lookin’ like class and he’s lookin’ like trash, Can’t get wit’ no deadbeat ass, So (no).
8. U1TV - Profile of a Giant - Susan B. Anthony - possibly one of the strangest radio documentaries I’ve ever come across - interesting in how boring this profile of a key player in introducing women’s suffrage in the USA is.
9. Pussy Riot - two members of this Russian anarchist-punk girl group are facing up to seven years in prison after performing a protest song in in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour of the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow in which they prayed to the Virgin Mary to get Putin out of office. Contemporary, even more politically engaged manifestation of riot grrrl movements and aesthetics of the ’90s? 
10. Tonight - Equality at Cambridge University - first broadcast on the BBC February 11, 1963. Recorded at a time when Cambridge University was the only higher education institution not to allow women to take part in all its activities, the BBC produced this report interviewing female students at Birmingham University and posing the question: do you prefer feminism to femininity (or, as becomes clear through the piece, wouldn’t you rather have boys chasing after you than compete with them in academia?).  
11. Mariah Carey - Up Out My Face feat. Nicki Minaj (instrumental) - Barbie personified style of vid from one of the most successful artists of all time. Mariah and Nicki don’t put up with their man cheatin’.  


#2
IDEAS FOR A PROJECT
LAUREN BARNES
Having met Robin Baker-Gibbs and Oli Fisher as part of AGORA at Tooting Market, I’m keen to think about possible ways of working with writers on future projects. Robin and Oli’s proposal for the day was to produce texts using verbal material found in the market: letters or fiction ‘that might incorporate language taken from the market- conversation (public and private), any publications, local and national newspapers, advertisements.’ One of our aims as a collective is to facilitate and produce work that is collaborative and that utilises and interacts with settings outside the conventional gallery space, so these sorts of writing, where the author’s ‘materials’ are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, would be something really interesting for us to explore further. 
We most commonly encounter creative writing in its written form, and then in a private setting – in books, magazines or on the internet – all things that we tend to read alone, rather than together. There’s nothing wrong with these contexts, and we’re certainly interested in the possibilities of online distribution as a collective, but I think one of our main aims is to make things happen in public spaces and between people. So how do we go about exhibiting or facilitating the performance of writing? 

One option might be to make public the act of writing. Will Self participated in an interesting project called [LINK] Further up in the Air run by the organisation Urban Words in Liverpool. They invited 18 artists and writers to respond to the demolition of the Linosa Tower block, producing work in the flats. Will Self wrote a short story inspired by the block, and as he wrote he pasted each page on the wall, revealing the process of his writing. Visitors could see the work progressing as residents of the block took them on ‘open studio’ tours.
Self’s exhibition of his work-in-progress in this scenario seems to resonate with his everyday writing practice – his website has some amazing photos of his writing room, with its walls plastered in post-its recording small fragments of text. There’s definitely potential in this idea for collaborative work, in which different contributors add their own post-its to a collage-like piece of text produced by a group that could be arranged and re-arranged in different configurations.  

But these ideas rely on the writers agreeing to reveal their work before it’s deemed ‘finished’, something that not everyone is happy to do, perhaps understandably so.  
Here too, the work of the artists remains in written form. Beyond exhibiting writing, a   potentially more dynamic way of presenting the work of writers is for this work to be performed – for stories and texts to be read, or simply spoken, aloud. 
The telling and re-telling of stories in an oral tradition is a fascinating process in which a story constantly evolves as certain elements are remembered and others improvised. While written media allow texts to be recognised by their individual authors, verbally transmitted stories can be a collective enterprise where a text does not belong to one author, but instead emerges as the product of many. Perhaps there’s potential in the act of storytelling for a more fluid and engaging way of presenting the work of writers to audiences. 
Especially when working with writers whose work originates in a specific location, as in the case of Robin and Oli’s work, the performance of the work ‘in its place’ can only make our experience of it more powerful.  In this context, we could play with different ‘rules’ and structures – writers may have to perform their work from memory, without reading it, for example. The collaborative question could also be pushed further in this situation. What about a ‘Chinese whispers’ scenario in which one writer’s piece of text is taken as the starting point for that of the next writer, who must respond in the performance setting?
These are just some initial thoughts that might fuel a discussion and some further progress on these ideas. The next step is, I think, to track down some writers or artists working with words who are pursuing similar or complementary ideas… watch this space!


#1
THE ROLE OF THE CURATOR TODAY
MEGHAN GOODEVE
 
cu·ra·tor (kyoo-rey-ter, kyoor-ey- for 1, 2; kyoor-uh-ter for 3) 
noun
1. the person in charge of a museum, art collection, etc.
2. a manager; superintendent.
3.Law . a guardian of a minor, lunatic, or other incompetent, especially with regard to his or her property.
Origin: 
1325–75;  < Latin,  equivalent to cūrā ( re ) to care for, attend to ( see cure) + -tor -tor;  replacing Middle English curatour  < Anglo-French  < Latin  as above
 
Related forms
cu·ra·to·ri·al (kyoor-uh-tawr-ee-uhl, -tohr-) adjective
cu·ra·tor·ship, noun
sub·cu·ra·tor, noun
sub·cu·ra·to·ri·al, adjective
sub·cu·ra·tor·ship, noun
 
Although art has moved outside the gallery, the framework of an audience’s reception has remained the same. The conventional role of a curator as noun, or a curator as ‘the person in charge’, is continuing even when art is being removed from gallery contexts, highlighting the need to reconsider what function a curator should have today. If art is re-contextualising itself outside the gallery, should a new relationship emerge between artist, curator and audience? Is there a need for a new approach to curating art in alternative spaces? Or, is the conventional hierarchy of curator as keeper of knowledge and the viewer/public as absorber of knowledge re-establishing itself within these new spaces of display? 
 
One example of the transition of art outside the gallery is its movement to online platforms that resist the physical boundaries of galleries. Online content is difficult to ‘manage’, and it is the manipulation of this ‘un-manageability’ by creating a space in which dialogue can build unedited that is the beauty of online projects. The most well-known examples of this today is online platforms for sharing, such as youtube or vimeo, where a visual piece is presented and the ‘audience’ comment on it, or curate their own shows through following links or adding new search topics. Although at first this seems rather arbitrary, the flexibility of an online user’s experience in comparison with the curator’s traditional control of an exhibition visitor’s experience could provide an interesting model to follow for future curatorial projects. If the spaces where art is shown, either inside or outside a gallery, could ensure the public were users rather then visitors than a model could be made where the dialogue between curator and public would be reciprocal rather than simply imparting the ‘correct’ knowledge. 
 
When discussing the emergence of this online culture, Charles Leadbeater creates a theory which he names The Art of With: ‘If the culture that the web is creating were to be reduced to a single, simple design principle it would be the principle of With. The web invites us to think and act with people, rather than for them, on their behalf or even doing things to them. The web is an invitation to connect with other people with whom we can share, exchange and create new knowledge and ideas through a process of structured lateral, free association of people and ideas. The principle underlying the web is the idea of endless, lateral connection.’ The potential of the internet for creating dialogues and connections can cause us to reconsider how art can be ‘curated’ on the internet, or to pursue this further, how art outside conventional gallery spaces can be rethought. If contemporary curatorial practice can shift its current role to a be more participatory-based, could the free association of ideas, which Leadbeater links to the internet, be created in art in new public spaces?
 
Moreover, in the same article as above, Leadbeater describes participatory contemporary artists as the ‘participatory avant-garde’, where: 
 
'Art is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. Art is not simply the result of self-expression by the artists of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The artist’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.'
 
If an artist’s role now is to ‘listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust’, so too must a curator? In fact if the above statement is altered so that ‘artist’ is replaced with ‘curator’, and ‘art’ replaced with ‘exhibition’, does this statement not hold an interesting look to the future of curating?
 
An exhibition is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. An exhibition is not simply the result of self-expression by the curators of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The curator’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.
 

#6

SURVIVAL TACTICS OF AN ART WORLD

MEGHAN GOODEVE

At noon they made a fire, grilled bits of meat and made scrambled eggs. Terry had a famous receipe for scrambled eggs, so took off his coat and rolled up his sleeves and altogether was as portentous as an alchemist concocting the elixir of life.

Terry in triumph, always more like an occult alchemist than a mere cook, mysteriously brought off the ham and eggs. They ate rather rapidly and silently, inside the hay-loft in the almost-darkness. Stanley complained because he lost his slice of sausage. Then mysteriously they packed up and prepared for sleep. Terry of course course gave a brief exhibition of how to sleep in a hay-hut, in deep hay. One made a hole as deep as possible, and etc. etc. etc. and finally one was buried completely under three feet of hay.

And in the sunshine, with people going lazily, and women sitting in the street under their green umbrellas selling black grapes and white grapes, and pears and peaches, and the old pointed houses rearing above the narrow, sunny flagged street, and the great tower rearing up to look, like some burly but competent feudal baron, and the shadows falling so dark and the sun so very bright – why, it all had that unspeakable charm of the real old Germany, before science came, and the horrible German theorising. The lovely old Germany that roamed along, so individualistic and vigorous under its lords, but so careless, so deep with life force.

Photographs of Fulda Campsite, Kassel, with extracts from DH Lawrence’s Mr Noon, an unfinished novel set in Germany and written by Lawrence while in exile (1922). First published in1985.

#5

PROCESS / / PROGRESS

LOTTE JOHNSON

A few months ago, I attended a discussion regarding the different “modalities” of translation that take place within the museum space, led by educator Amir Parsa. Among the numerous definitions of the term considered by Parsa, one particular strand of translation stood out to me, that performed by the curator for a public. One of the salient points that surfaced during the discussion was the selective action of curating, particularly taking place in large-scale institutions where often only works of the highest merit or from the strongest point in an artist’s career are shown. I began to think about different modes of practice, and how important (and stimulating) the early stages of an artist’s development can be. Further into this discussion, Parsa was joined by two publishers, to whom he proposed the significance and fruitfulness of exploring a work from a so-called “difficult” stage of a writer or artist’s career, a period of flux and evolution.

This proposal of exploring a work “in progress” resonated with some of my own recent thoughts, particularly in relation to the work of Tom Thayer, whose work I had seen in the Whitney Biennial in New York. Thayer himself occupied the third floor of the Whitney for two weekends, operating in the spaces where his works were displayed. The Whitney called his occupations “live performances”; to me, these afternoons were an insight into Thayer at work, engaging in a process of continual re-activation and regeneration of his own pieces. I felt as though I had stumbled into the artist’s studio, observing as Thayer moved swiftly around the space, adjusting a puppet’s flailing arms, moving a projector’s piercing beam of light, cutting and pasting pieces of paper to change the projected silhouette, pulling down a strange hanging box-construction to attach a string and then pluck at it. Another man (who I later learned was one of Thayer’s graduate students) assisted him. Acting as collaborative orchestrators, they periodically signalled to each other, exchanged materials, or communicated in low tones. It soon became impossible to distinguish separate pieces in the space, rather the body of work formed a sort of animated workshop, a collaborative whole.


Watching Thayer at work was like standing in the wings at the theatre, at once privy to the performance and its construction. His creations are multi-functional; each object that he has made is repurposed to provide the starting point or raw material for the next. Collages intended as backdrops for animations are framed on the wall, three-dimensional constructions become bizarre musical instruments. By animating his own work, he conjures abstract mythic narratives, but always leaves the skeleton of his work exposed. It seems there is no final piece. His holistic approach to his many mediums is striking, but ever more so when you watch him manipulating and activating these works in real time.

Lauren addressed related ideas in her previous blog post (see below), proposing the possibility of collaborative work in which the author’s “materials” are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, and the idea of making public the act of writing. Applying this idea to the work of practising visual artists could be equally invigorating, and Thayer provides an interesting model for the kind of expansive, evolving and transparent practice that I feel that 20//20 pursues as a curatorial collective.


#4

SOME THOUGHTS ON CURATING AND PERFORMANCE ART

RACHEL STRATTON

In late 1960’s New York, a new genre of art came into being- the performance. Defying traditional views of the artwork as a static, self contained entity; artists like Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys and Allan Kaprow began expressing themselves through durational ‘actions’ or ‘happenings’.

These physical interventions established a new relationship between artist and viewer whereby both parties were integral to the piece, each relying on the other to determine the outcome. In Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece, audience members were invited to pick up the scissors at will and snip away at the clothing on her body. No one had determined the outcome of the piece- who should volunteer or how much material to cut, so the thrill came from watching and assisting the development of the work from beginning to end.

Performance has since become central to contemporary art and has paved the way for the boom in New Media that pervades the visual arts today. Comparatively, the art of curating has developed at a more leisurely pace, only becoming subject to that same introspective, critical eye in the last decade or so.  Coming out of our recent ArchLIVE project for Agora, I want to apply the model of Performance art to the field of curating, looking at ways it can inform our understanding of the relation between 

(see Meghan’s blog entry #1)

In its traditional form the exhibition is a static entity that presents works of art in a singular narrative chosen by the curator. As the audience moves through the space, clues for interpreting the works are provided by the arrangement and any accompanying text. To consider it as a performance piece however would transform the exhibition into a dynamic environment, in which the narrative and interpretation of artworks are determined by the specific circumstances of the moment. The ArchLIVE project attempted this by continually looking to the outside world to find new ways of aiding interpretation. Each discussion held with an artist, member of the public or market seller yielded a different relationship with the artworks, all of which were noted and archived to offer people another “way in”.

In this way, the narrative of the exhibition evolves simultaneously to the audiences that pass through it, so the spectators have an impact on how the works are perceived. Rather than accepting a particular reading by one curator, they become aware of the plethora of interpretations to be made about any one artwork. The process of curating is laid bare, open for all to see, comment upon and critique. In the performance piece this primacy of “process” is key, as the audience witnesses the evolution from conception to actuality and often destruction in the course of the “happening”. Maria Abramovic, one of the original performance artists of the ‘70’s describes it thus,

“The performance you do in fixed time and in that fixed time you see the whole process and you see the disappearing of the process at the same moment and afterwards you don’t have anything, you have only the memory”

Might we not discover a different type of exhibition if we apply the same principles? Abramovic delights in the transitory nature of her work, without concern for her historic legacy. She celebrates the fact that the piece lives on only in the memories of those who witnessed it. To stage an exhibition in this way would prioritise the physical experience of being there and allow individuals to engage in a unique, highly personal dialogue that lives on through their perception of it.

I will finish with the nearest example I could think of to this form of exhibition. It comes, perhaps unsurprisingly, from Hans Ulrich Obrist. In his Do It project, he asked 168 artists to write out simple instructions for producing works of art, which he compiled in a book for general release. Since its conception in 1993, 40 different cities worldwide have staged this exhibition, each applying their own interpretation to the instructions and achieving different outcomes. To mark the twentieth anniversary of the project, Obrist is now bringing them all together in an archive of recorded information that will serve to highlight just how diverse different interpretations of the same thing can be. It puts the viewer in the position of both artist and curator, enabling them to play out their own understanding and add to the vast body of interpretations.

Obrist’s project is the first step along the way to a new type of curating that champions multiple interpretations and an active, critically engaged audience. Drawing parallels between performance and curating is just one way of exploring how we might take this further. The question then remains how to put these ideas into action and whether artists would consider it a conflict with their work?


#3

SOUND AND WOMEN - A MIX OF RESEARCH

MARIANNE FORREST

A lot of my 20//20 and personal research recently has been concerned with the portrayal of women and the ‘feminine’ in popular media. In particular I’ve been looking into how women are presented on film and radio, and how they use these formats to present themselves. I’ve pulled together some of the sources I’ve been working with, along with some more general popular culture references, into an audio mix with accompanying ‘sleeve notes’. All sources and further reading can be clicked-through to in the tracklist below.

1. Margaret Thatcher - 'The Lady's not for turning' speech delivered to the Conservative party conference in Brighton on October 10, 1980. With the release of ‘The Iron Lady’ last year suddenly conversations about whether Thatcher should be considered a feminist icon suddenly started up again. This Guardian comment piece has some views on that, along with a good dose of vitriol: And just to show that women can do anything men can do, she started a war, rode around on a tank in her headscarf, created loads more widows, thought herself terrifically grand and used the royal plural for her very own (Michelle Hanson).

2. Niko Karamyan - Meet Me at Bebe, BB (DIS Magazine) Every mall has them; meet the celebrity mallrats of LA’s famous gallerias. Post-Khardashian photo shoot of a certain type of LA femininity. Audio taken from accompanying mix by Napolian.

3. Brynn Brooks (dir.) - Women at Work, The Lesser Half (first broadcast on the BBC February 6, 1974). Taken from the BBC’s Second Wave Feminism archive, this discussion show investigates a selection of women’s attitudes towards work, the workplace and exploring ‘male’ jobs. The mix features other clips from this archive, which is interesting not only for hearing women speak during a period so instrumental in furthering women’s rights, but also to see how the traditional modes of BBC reporting deal with these stories (often with a certain amount of disdain).

4. Grimes - Oblivion Currently the darling of music and fashion industries alike, Grimes’ Claire Boucher Twitter vents her exasperation with the sex-over-substance media interest in her:

5. M.I.A. - Vikki Leekx (clip) Rob Horning writing for PopMatters highlighted M.I.A.’s struggles with privilege as part of how classic capitalist co-optation worked, making her vulnerable to anti-feminist and political character assassination, feeling that the profiler “sided at a deeper level with capitalism, marginalizing and dismissing M.I.A.’s efforts to embody the contradictions, as it were, as simple hypocrisy.” He continued “M.I.A. struggles obviously with being a sell-out” whereas the writer “has been a sell-out all along and now enforces for capitalism and the Establishment against those in the gray area. The same old story: character assassination and ad hominem attacks on the messenger” so that the message will be ignored or invalidated - (via Wikipedia) written in response to Lynn Hirschberg’s pretty damning New York Times profile of M.I.A. M.I.A. consensus often seems to be that she should be less political and more of a typical female popstar (advice here from The Vulture5. Keep shit-talking Lady Gaga. Remember when you said: “[My image is] not like ‘Haus of Gaga’ … Me blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples and shit”? That was hilarious! More outspokenness directed at self-serious pop stars, and less about how Google is spying on us, would be fantastic.

6. Pussy Cat Club - reported by Bob Langley for BBC in 1970. Now a completely ridiculous feature about the Pussy Cat Club, a group of women who actively opposed women’s liberation and demanded traditional male/female roles to be upheld. 

7. TLC - No Scrubs (DJ Copy remix) One of the most successful R+B groups of the ’90s and best-selling American female groups of all time. Nice example of ’90s vocalisations of ‘independent women’ But a scrub is checkin’ me, But his game is kinda weak, And I know that he cannot approach me, Cuz I’m lookin’ like class and he’s lookin’ like trash, Can’t get wit’ no deadbeat ass, So (no).

8. U1TV - Profile of a Giant - Susan B. Anthony - possibly one of the strangest radio documentaries I’ve ever come across - interesting in how boring this profile of a key player in introducing women’s suffrage in the USA is.

9. Pussy Riot - two members of this Russian anarchist-punk girl group are facing up to seven years in prison after performing a protest song in in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour of the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow in which they prayed to the Virgin Mary to get Putin out of office. Contemporary, even more politically engaged manifestation of riot grrrl movements and aesthetics of the ’90s? 

10. Tonight - Equality at Cambridge University - first broadcast on the BBC February 11, 1963. Recorded at a time when Cambridge University was the only higher education institution not to allow women to take part in all its activities, the BBC produced this report interviewing female students at Birmingham University and posing the question: do you prefer feminism to femininity (or, as becomes clear through the piece, wouldn’t you rather have boys chasing after you than compete with them in academia?).  

11. Mariah Carey - Up Out My Face feat. Nicki Minaj (instrumental) - Barbie personified style of vid from one of the most successful artists of all time. Mariah and Nicki don’t put up with their man cheatin’.  



#2

IDEAS FOR A PROJECT

LAUREN BARNES

Having met Robin Baker-Gibbs and Oli Fisher as part of AGORA at Tooting Market, I’m keen to think about possible ways of working with writers on future projects. Robin and Oli’s proposal for the day was to produce texts using verbal material found in the market: letters or fiction ‘that might incorporate language taken from the market- conversation (public and private), any publications, local and national newspapers, advertisements.’ One of our aims as a collective is to facilitate and produce work that is collaborative and that utilises and interacts with settings outside the conventional gallery space, so these sorts of writing, where the author’s ‘materials’ are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, would be something really interesting for us to explore further. 

We most commonly encounter creative writing in its written form, and then in a private setting – in books, magazines or on the internet – all things that we tend to read alone, rather than together. There’s nothing wrong with these contexts, and we’re certainly interested in the possibilities of online distribution as a collective, but I think one of our main aims is to make things happen in public spaces and between people. So how do we go about exhibiting or facilitating the performance of writing? 

One option might be to make public the act of writing. Will Self participated in an interesting project called [LINK] Further up in the Air run by the organisation Urban Words in Liverpool. They invited 18 artists and writers to respond to the demolition of the Linosa Tower block, producing work in the flats. Will Self wrote a short story inspired by the block, and as he wrote he pasted each page on the wall, revealing the process of his writing. Visitors could see the work progressing as residents of the block took them on ‘open studio’ tours.

Self’s exhibition of his work-in-progress in this scenario seems to resonate with his everyday writing practice – his website has some amazing photos of his writing room, with its walls plastered in post-its recording small fragments of text. There’s definitely potential in this idea for collaborative work, in which different contributors add their own post-its to a collage-like piece of text produced by a group that could be arranged and re-arranged in different configurations.  

But these ideas rely on the writers agreeing to reveal their work before it’s deemed ‘finished’, something that not everyone is happy to do, perhaps understandably so.  

Here too, the work of the artists remains in written form. Beyond exhibiting writing, a   potentially more dynamic way of presenting the work of writers is for this work to be performed – for stories and texts to be read, or simply spoken, aloud. 

The telling and re-telling of stories in an oral tradition is a fascinating process in which a story constantly evolves as certain elements are remembered and others improvised. While written media allow texts to be recognised by their individual authors, verbally transmitted stories can be a collective enterprise where a text does not belong to one author, but instead emerges as the product of many. Perhaps there’s potential in the act of storytelling for a more fluid and engaging way of presenting the work of writers to audiences. 

Especially when working with writers whose work originates in a specific location, as in the case of Robin and Oli’s work, the performance of the work ‘in its place’ can only make our experience of it more powerful.  In this context, we could play with different ‘rules’ and structures – writers may have to perform their work from memory, without reading it, for example. The collaborative question could also be pushed further in this situation. What about a ‘Chinese whispers’ scenario in which one writer’s piece of text is taken as the starting point for that of the next writer, who must respond in the performance setting?

These are just some initial thoughts that might fuel a discussion and some further progress on these ideas. The next step is, I think, to track down some writers or artists working with words who are pursuing similar or complementary ideas… watch this space!



#1

THE ROLE OF THE CURATOR TODAY

MEGHAN GOODEVE

 

cu·ra·tor (kyoo-rey-ter, kyoor-ey- for 1, 2; kyoor-uh-ter for 3)

noun

1. the person in charge of a museum, art collection, etc.

2. a manager; superintendent.

3.Law . a guardian of a minor, lunatic, or other incompetent, especially with regard to his or her property.

Origin:

1325–75;  < Latin,  equivalent to cūrā ( re ) to care for, attend to ( see cure) + -tor -tor;  replacing Middle English curatour  < Anglo-French  < Latin  as above

 

Related forms

cu·ra·to·ri·al (kyoor-uh-tawr-ee-uhl, -tohr-) adjective

cu·ra·tor·ship, noun

sub·cu·ra·tor, noun

sub·cu·ra·to·ri·al, adjective

sub·cu·ra·tor·ship, noun

 

Although art has moved outside the gallery, the framework of an audience’s reception has remained the same. The conventional role of a curator as noun, or a curator as ‘the person in charge’, is continuing even when art is being removed from gallery contexts, highlighting the need to reconsider what function a curator should have today. If art is re-contextualising itself outside the gallery, should a new relationship emerge between artist, curator and audience? Is there a need for a new approach to curating art in alternative spaces? Or, is the conventional hierarchy of curator as keeper of knowledge and the viewer/public as absorber of knowledge re-establishing itself within these new spaces of display?

 

One example of the transition of art outside the gallery is its movement to online platforms that resist the physical boundaries of galleries. Online content is difficult to ‘manage’, and it is the manipulation of this ‘un-manageability’ by creating a space in which dialogue can build unedited that is the beauty of online projects. The most well-known examples of this today is online platforms for sharing, such as youtube or vimeo, where a visual piece is presented and the ‘audience’ comment on it, or curate their own shows through following links or adding new search topics. Although at first this seems rather arbitrary, the flexibility of an online user’s experience in comparison with the curator’s traditional control of an exhibition visitor’s experience could provide an interesting model to follow for future curatorial projects. If the spaces where art is shown, either inside or outside a gallery, could ensure the public were users rather then visitors than a model could be made where the dialogue between curator and public would be reciprocal rather than simply imparting the ‘correct’ knowledge.

 

When discussing the emergence of this online culture, Charles Leadbeater creates a theory which he names The Art of With: ‘If the culture that the web is creating were to be reduced to a single, simple design principle it would be the principle of With. The web invites us to think and act with people, rather than for them, on their behalf or even doing things to them. The web is an invitation to connect with other people with whom we can share, exchange and create new knowledge and ideas through a process of structured lateral, free association of people and ideas. The principle underlying the web is the idea of endless, lateral connection.’ The potential of the internet for creating dialogues and connections can cause us to reconsider how art can be ‘curated’ on the internet, or to pursue this further, how art outside conventional gallery spaces can be rethought. If contemporary curatorial practice can shift its current role to a be more participatory-based, could the free association of ideas, which Leadbeater links to the internet, be created in art in new public spaces?

 

Moreover, in the same article as above, Leadbeater describes participatory contemporary artists as the ‘participatory avant-garde’, where:

 

'Art is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. Art is not simply the result of self-expression by the artists of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The artist’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.'

 

If an artist’s role now is to ‘listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust’, so too must a curator? In fact if the above statement is altered so that ‘artist’ is replaced with ‘curator’, and ‘art’ replaced with ‘exhibition’, does this statement not hold an interesting look to the future of curating?

 

An exhibition is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. An exhibition is not simply the result of self-expression by the curators of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The curator’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.

 

Amanda de Cadenet - The Conversation - http://www.theconversation.tv/show/
http://www.sidereel.com/gallery_girls
http://www.pirateshows.net/gallery-girls-season-1-episode-1-all-tomorrows-parties/

http://www.sidereel.com/the_only_way_is_essex
http://icrazeepisodes.info/sex-and-the-city-season-1-episode-05-the-power-of-female-sex/
http://api.ning.com/files/FyJow1OZVnJ0lvIrDz3OLnpAttlgmAqu-1dId-qRe1pOwascnUlhlOJsdBQchbHI3E6O3nHPkIKW1PhWT21ZOQSKrPnR9y9a/WAL_FurZwei.jpg
http://www.diacenter.org/exhibitions/pressrelease/109
http://www.judychicago.com/educator/timeline.php
http://www.astudiooftheirown.org/legacy.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01m495b/Womans_Hour_Weekend_Womans_Hour_PostNatal_Psychosis 
http://www.takeabreak.co.uk/
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/aug/27/pussy-riot-interview-yekaterina-samutsevich?newsfeed=true
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njWwegLURCg

http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/index.htm 
http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/feminists-pioneer-conversation-radio
http://archiv.fridericianum-kassel.de/kunsthalle_bisher.html
http://www.wdw.nl/event/prompts-triggers-surplus-authors/
http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/821187/brooklyn-museums-latest-crowd-curated-show-tells-visitors-to-move-beyond-the-like-button
http://www.gobrooklynart.org/
http://projectanywhere.net/about
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~carlos/607/readings/bakhtin.pdf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mGS__7jW9M&amp;feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4nMZRRT7ZI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&amp;feature=fvwp&amp;v=Mo0jvJeDPms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjjIs1FttfE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_tACz7-Mg&amp;feature=related
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1g33PwAACAAJ&amp;dq=situation+claire+doherty&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=KOAwM5YyqR&amp;sig=LtdQxsRhMO3qmRU6hSuR2vOZjN4&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=2jo_UPLCGbGN0wWn9IFA&amp;ved=0CDIQ6AEwAQ
http://www.unc.edu/courses/2006spring/geog/021/001/massey.pdf
http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp/91st/91st_Archive/vol4_n1/pdfs/trivedi.pdf
http://www.chairlifted.com/metbefore/
http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/ball_hugo/Ball-Hugo_Karawane-Trio-Ex-Voco.mp3
http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/normalization-2/
http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/65633.html
http://www.gilbert-garcin.com/chrono/photos/photo_2008_357.php

Amanda de Cadenet - The Conversation - http://www.theconversation.tv/show/

http://www.sidereel.com/gallery_girls

http://www.pirateshows.net/gallery-girls-season-1-episode-1-all-tomorrows-parties/

http://www.sidereel.com/the_only_way_is_essex

http://icrazeepisodes.info/sex-and-the-city-season-1-episode-05-the-power-of-female-sex/

http://api.ning.com/files/FyJow1OZVnJ0lvIrDz3OLnpAttlgmAqu-1dId-qRe1pOwascnUlhlOJsdBQchbHI3E6O3nHPkIKW1PhWT21ZOQSKrPnR9y9a/WAL_FurZwei.jpg

http://www.diacenter.org/exhibitions/pressrelease/109

http://www.judychicago.com/educator/timeline.php

http://www.astudiooftheirown.org/legacy.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01m495b/Womans_Hour_Weekend_Womans_Hour_PostNatal_Psychosis 

http://www.takeabreak.co.uk/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/aug/27/pussy-riot-interview-yekaterina-samutsevich?newsfeed=true

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njWwegLURCg

http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/index.htm 

http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/feminists-pioneer-conversation-radio

http://archiv.fridericianum-kassel.de/kunsthalle_bisher.html

http://www.wdw.nl/event/prompts-triggers-surplus-authors/

http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/821187/brooklyn-museums-latest-crowd-curated-show-tells-visitors-to-move-beyond-the-like-button

http://www.gobrooklynart.org/

http://projectanywhere.net/about

http://www.public.iastate.edu/~carlos/607/readings/bakhtin.pdf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mGS__7jW9M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4nMZRRT7ZI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=fvwp&v=Mo0jvJeDPms

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjjIs1FttfE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_tACz7-Mg&feature=related

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1g33PwAACAAJ&dq=situation+claire+doherty&source=bl&ots=KOAwM5YyqR&sig=LtdQxsRhMO3qmRU6hSuR2vOZjN4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2jo_UPLCGbGN0wWn9IFA&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAQ

http://www.unc.edu/courses/2006spring/geog/021/001/massey.pdf

http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp/91st/91st_Archive/vol4_n1/pdfs/trivedi.pdf

http://www.chairlifted.com/metbefore/

http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/ball_hugo/Ball-Hugo_Karawane-Trio-Ex-Voco.mp3

http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/normalization-2/

http://www.gilbert-garcin.com/chrono/photos/photo_2008_357.php

20//20 present: Aegis.
Aegis is an exploration of what is important to protect in the changing landscape of Shoreditch and its environs. Participatory pieces by a photographer, sound artist and textile artists collaborated on a multimedia psycho-geographic map of the potential future of the area. 
In the future, we hope the project will culminate in a subversive alternative to a corporate-style development launch; a refreshing antidote to those that advertise the apparently wholly positive effects of Olympic-style re-generation.
Soosan Lolavar // Yuli Levtov
This collaborative piece by electronic composer Soosan and sound engineer Yuli, explores the unique characteristics of the East End. Together they have constructed an interactive sonic map that captures fleeting moments of the sonic landscape in the area. These sounds are combined with images of recording locations forming ‘sonic postcards’ that psycho-geographically map the area.
Find out more about Soosan’s work at www.soosanlolavar.com and Yuli’s work at http://flavors.me/ylevtov
Rosie Carr // Meghan Heinl-Rimmer
Taking the concept of the aegis in literal terms, contemporary artists Rosie and Meghan have produced a piece from scraps of found material. The work lies somewhere between a protest banner and protective cloak, a symbolic shield responding to the history of the textile industry in Shoreditch, and its demise. Throughout the weekend members of the public are invited to add their own contribution. The result will be a completely collaborative one off ‘commodity’ that cannot be purchased- a contrast to the commercial character of Box Park.
Elizabeth Bicher
Each image documents photographer Bicher’s reaction to 20//20 Collective’s call to protect, displaying her personal East End. To produce these photographs she travelled around East London documenting three categories – a mode of transport, a public space and a building, often giving the viewer a chance to see interiors and exteriors, or different viewpoints.
Bicher invites you to participate in this photographic conversation by taking your own photographs of a mode of transport, a public space and a building using your camera of choice. These can be emailed to 20//20 Collective’s Flickr on end85making@photos.flickr.com, where they will be displayed in Boxpark and documented as part of the Aegis project.
Aegis took place as a part of Uncontained on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd June at 55DSL Store, Boxpark, 2-4 , Bethnal Green Rd, Shoreditch, London E1&#160;6GY.

20//20 present: Aegis.

Aegis is an exploration of what is important to protect in the changing landscape of Shoreditch and its environs. Participatory pieces by a photographer, sound artist and textile artists collaborated on a multimedia psycho-geographic map of the potential future of the area.

In the future, we hope the project will culminate in a subversive alternative to a corporate-style development launch; a refreshing antidote to those that advertise the apparently wholly positive effects of Olympic-style re-generation.

Soosan Lolavar // Yuli Levtov

This collaborative piece by electronic composer Soosan and sound engineer Yuli, explores the unique characteristics of the East End. Together they have constructed an interactive sonic map that captures fleeting moments of the sonic landscape in the area. These sounds are combined with images of recording locations forming ‘sonic postcards’ that psycho-geographically map the area.

Find out more about Soosan’s work at www.soosanlolavar.com and Yuli’s work at http://flavors.me/ylevtov

Rosie Carr // Meghan Heinl-Rimmer

Taking the concept of the aegis in literal terms, contemporary artists Rosie and Meghan have produced a piece from scraps of found material. The work lies somewhere between a protest banner and protective cloak, a symbolic shield responding to the history of the textile industry in Shoreditch, and its demise. Throughout the weekend members of the public are invited to add their own contribution. The result will be a completely collaborative one off ‘commodity’ that cannot be purchased- a contrast to the commercial character of Box Park.

Elizabeth Bicher

Each image documents photographer Bicher’s reaction to 20//20 Collective’s call to protect, displaying her personal East End. To produce these photographs she travelled around East London documenting three categories – a mode of transport, a public space and a building, often giving the viewer a chance to see interiors and exteriors, or different viewpoints.

Bicher invites you to participate in this photographic conversation by taking your own photographs of a mode of transport, a public space and a building using your camera of choice. These can be emailed to 20//20 Collective’s Flickr on end85making@photos.flickr.com, where they will be displayed in Boxpark and documented as part of the Aegis project.

Aegis took place as a part of Uncontained on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd June at 55DSL Store, Boxpark, 2-4 , Bethnal Green Rd, Shoreditch, London E1 6GY.



As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.
- Tooting recycling project
- Interesting film about art in public places from 1951. An art exhibition in a pub in Tooting! Really great film!
- Film about Butchers’ college… another great one!
- comedy about the office…
- how to be the ‘laziest and still get paid’
- The Office motivational speech…
- art and protest?
- Documentary about pirate radio stations in London
- Video about how to make a radio
- Miles, Malcolm (1997) Art, Space and the City. Public Art and Urban Futures, London: Routledge.
- Boris Groys: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/marx-after-duchamp-or-the-artist’s-two-bodies/
- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2118147/BUDGET-2012-summary-Public-sector-workers-north-paid-less.html?ito=feeds-newsxml
- http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/the-staggers/2012/03/politicians-money-work-society
- http://www.marxists.org/archive/morris/works/1884/art-lab.htm
- http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/sixth-london-conference/sessions-and-paper-abstracts/0068.txt
- Manual labour&#160;: engaging with contemporary art through collaborative activity / [artist, Jon Lockhart&#160;; texts by Nicolas de Oliveira &#8230; [et al.]&#160;; edited by Erica Burton and Sarah Mossop.]. 
- Work and the image&#160;: 1. Work, craft and labour&#160;: visual representations in changing histories&#160;; 2. Work in modern times&#160;: visual mediations and social processes / edited by 
- Reuse value&#160;: spolia and appropriation in art and architecture, from Constantine to Sherrie Levine / edited by Richard Brilliant and Dale Kinney.
- The &#8216;do-it-yourself&#8217; artwork&#160;: participation from fluxus to new media / edited by Anna Dezeuze.
- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2053546/Lazy-workers-sacked-explanation-government-told.html
- http://liberalconspiracy.org/2012/02/18/laziness-levels-in-britain-getting-lazier-wails-government/


Lucia Stamati

- http://www.workandplayscrapstore.org.uk/home/
- http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/found-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-aldrich-contemporary-art-museum/
- http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2010/04/05/100-years-a-history-of-performance-art 
- http://www.e-flux.com/program/allan-sekula-this-ain’t-china/
- http://www.variant.org.uk/events/art+labour/Art+Labour.html
- Dada and the found object






Work by Koki Tanaka - interesting point of reference for Mette Hammer Juhl&#8217;s work &#8216;It&#8217;s not as good as I expected it to be&#8217;: Koki Tanaka, Buckets and Balls, 2005. See also skateboarding videos&#8230;.
Vlada Maria, &#8217;Anything for any price&#8217;
Vlada Maria asked us to produce a text about her work for the AGORA publication:
Trading her number in for a pig’s head to take pride of place on a marble slab. A slab on a slab.
‘Anything for any price!’, ‘Anything for any price – I make special price for you!’
Everything on the cart is rubbish. A gentleman wants to make a purchase but she’s not sure she can part with it – she’ll let him know later, and make him a special price.
‘Are you scared?’ 
‘Do you need anything? Anything for any price.’
She has everything on the cart. Everything? Everything. 
Would you like to buy something? Come on – have this present. It’s just a present – a flower for your girlfriend or mother? They’re only £1. 
What has she got? Anything. A pig’s head. Everything. She has a cart of presents for exchange – nothing at all is really free. 
 
 
The end result is £5.20 in cash and some sugar and a pig’s head – successful sales pitches.

As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.

Tooting recycling project

Interesting film about art in public places from 1951. An art exhibition in a pub in Tooting! Really great film!

Film about Butchers’ college… another great one!

comedy about the office…

how to be the ‘laziest and still get paid’

The Office motivational speech…

art and protest?

Documentary about pirate radio stations in London

- Video about how to make a radio

- Miles, Malcolm (1997) Art, Space and the City. Public Art and Urban Futures, London: Routledge.

- Boris Groys: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/marx-after-duchamp-or-the-artist’s-two-bodies/

- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2118147/BUDGET-2012-summary-Public-sector-workers-north-paid-less.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

- http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/the-staggers/2012/03/politicians-money-work-society

- http://www.marxists.org/archive/morris/works/1884/art-lab.htm

- http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/sixth-london-conference/sessions-and-paper-abstracts/0068.txt

- Manual labour : engaging with contemporary art through collaborative activity / [artist, Jon Lockhart ; texts by Nicolas de Oliveira … [et al.] ; edited by Erica Burton and Sarah Mossop.]. 

- Work and the image : 1. Work, craft and labour : visual representations in changing histories ; 2. Work in modern times : visual mediations and social processes / edited by 

- Reuse value : spolia and appropriation in art and architecture, from Constantine to Sherrie Levine / edited by Richard Brilliant and Dale Kinney.

- The ‘do-it-yourself’ artwork : participation from fluxus to new media / edited by Anna Dezeuze.

- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2053546/Lazy-workers-sacked-explanation-government-told.html

- http://liberalconspiracy.org/2012/02/18/laziness-levels-in-britain-getting-lazier-wails-government/

Lucia Stamati

- http://www.workandplayscrapstore.org.uk/home/

- http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/found-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-aldrich-contemporary-art-museum/

- http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2010/04/05/100-years-a-history-of-performance-art 

- http://www.e-flux.com/program/allan-sekula-this-ain’t-china/

- http://www.variant.org.uk/events/art+labour/Art+Labour.html

- Dada and the found object

Work by Koki Tanaka - interesting point of reference for Mette Hammer Juhl’s work ‘It’s not as good as I expected it to be’: Koki Tanaka, Buckets and Balls, 2005. See also skateboarding videos….

Vlada Maria, ’Anything for any price’

Vlada Maria asked us to produce a text about her work for the AGORA publication:

Trading her number in for a pig’s head to take pride of place on a marble slab. A slab on a slab.

‘Anything for any price!’, ‘Anything for any price – I make special price for you!’

Everything on the cart is rubbish. A gentleman wants to make a purchase but she’s not sure she can part with it – she’ll let him know later, and make him a special price.

‘Are you scared?’

‘Do you need anything? Anything for any price.’

She has everything on the cart. Everything? Everything.

Would you like to buy something? Come on – have this present. It’s just a present – a flower for your girlfriend or mother? They’re only £1.

What has she got? Anything. A pig’s head. Everything. She has a cart of presents for exchange – nothing at all is really free.

 

 

The end result is £5.20 in cash and some sugar and a pig’s head – successful sales pitches.

archLIVE #1: 16/03/12
As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.
Preliminary materials:
- David Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, 2008
- Nina Powers, One Dimensional Woman, 2011
- Linda Nochlin Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays
- Taschen&#8217;s Women Artists
- Kristen Frederickson Singular Women: Writing the Artist&#8230; 
- Charles Leadbeater, The Art of With
- Sampling tracker
- DJ Shadows Album
- Psychogeography Tooting
- Sound Artists
- Beyonce, Year of 4
- Sex and the City - Careers
- Pussy Cat Club
- Doll&#8217;s House - Bella the Welder
- Women at Work: The Lesser Half
-  Kurt Vonnegut on Short Stories
- The New School, Women
- Meiro Koizumi
- Tooting Dancing Man
- Russian minimalist poets who use snippets of overheard conversation to create poetry
- Doug Aitken&#8217;s sound experiments
- Hayley Lock&#8217;s soundcloud
- On Kawara&#8217;s telegrams/letters
- Shilpa Gupta
- Harun Farocki 
- lecture by Maurice Benayoun
- Community Arts Lecture
- Participation in the Arts Lecture
- Dear X
- XX Chromosocial Women
- Astronauts of Inner Space
Discussion #1








Questions for Emma Sywyj


Emma Sywyj - Conversation





Robin Baker-Gibbs - Conversation




Oscar Cass-Darweish Conversation

Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs Conversation

]]>

archLIVE #1: 16/03/12

As part of AGORA, 20//20 launch archLIVE - a live and fluid documentation of dialogues/references/materials/investigations available to access free online as a document of an event and a resource for future research.

Preliminary materials:

- David Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, 2008

- Nina Powers, One Dimensional Woman, 2011

- Linda Nochlin Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays

- Taschen’s Women Artists

- Kristen Frederickson Singular Women: Writing the Artist… 

- Charles Leadbeater, The Art of With

Sampling tracker

DJ Shadows Album

Psychogeography Tooting

Sound Artists

Beyonce, Year of 4

- Sex and the City - Careers

Pussy Cat Club

Doll’s House - Bella the Welder

Women at Work: The Lesser Half

-  Kurt Vonnegut on Short Stories

The New School, Women

Meiro Koizumi

Tooting Dancing Man

- Russian minimalist poets who use snippets of overheard conversation to create poetry

- Doug Aitken’s sound experiments

- Hayley Lock’s soundcloud

- On Kawara’s telegrams/letters

- Shilpa Gupta

- Harun Farocki 

lecture by Maurice Benayoun

Community Arts Lecture

Participation in the Arts Lecture

- Dear X

- XX Chromosocial Women

- Astronauts of Inner Space

Discussion #1

Questions for Emma Sywyj

Emma Sywyj - Conversation

Robin Baker-Gibbs - Conversation

Oscar Cass-Darweish Conversation

Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs Conversation

20//20 will be curating two days of AGORA at Tooting Market (12th-24th March 2012).
We will be working in the project space on Friday 16th March and Friday 23rd March.
Friday 16th artist collaborators:
- Emma Sywyj
- Oscar Cass-Darweish
- Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs
- Roseena Hussain

About AGORA:
11 days of experimentation and market testing based in Tooting Market, over 40 Graphic Designers, Artists, Writers, Filmakers, producers and Musicians collaborating towards the Project. Each day, the group will meet in the AGORA installed outside Brick Box, a series of discussions will take place before the individual projects, which will all negotiate a relationship between within the context of a market and the physicality of the space. The accumulation of which will see us launch the &#8216;AGORA PUBLICATION&#8217; @ UNORTHABOX on the 24th March.
Find out more about the project at the AGORA website.

20//20 will be curating two days of AGORA at Tooting Market (12th-24th March 2012).

We will be working in the project space on Friday 16th March and Friday 23rd March.

Friday 16th artist collaborators:

- Emma Sywyj

- Oscar Cass-Darweish

- Oli Fisher + Robin Baker-Gibbs

- Roseena Hussain

About AGORA:

11 days of experimentation and market testing based in Tooting Market, over 40 Graphic Designers, Artists, Writers, Filmakers, producers and Musicians collaborating towards the Project. Each day, the group will meet in the AGORA installed outside Brick Box, a series of discussions will take place before the individual projects, which will all negotiate a relationship between within the context of a market and the physicality of the space. The accumulation of which will see us launch the ‘AGORA PUBLICATION’ @ UNORTHABOX on the 24th March.

Find out more about the project at the AGORA website.

Rosie Carr - BGWMC
16mm film transferred to video - works best viewed with red/cyan filtered glasses.
A ‘3D’ movie shot entirely with an anaglyphic lens based on a design for a ‘lunch box lens’ (so called as it came apart and could be hidden neatly inside a plastic lunchbox) circulated amongst stereoscope enthusiasts in the 1980s.
This film was comissioned by 20//20 for the exhibition 20//20 @ BGWMC.
Sound in collaboration with Sam Mackay
With thanks to:
20//20 collective
BGWMC
Edward Nowill 
No.w.here film lab
Sam Ford

Rosie Carr - BGWMC

16mm film transferred to video - works best viewed with red/cyan filtered glasses.

A ‘3D’ movie shot entirely with an anaglyphic lens based on a design for a ‘lunch box lens’ (so called as it came apart and could be hidden neatly inside a plastic lunchbox) circulated amongst stereoscope enthusiasts in the 1980s.

This film was comissioned by 20//20 for the exhibition 20//20 @ BGWMC.

Sound in collaboration with Sam Mackay

With thanks to:

20//20 collective

BGWMC

Edward Nowill 

No.w.here film lab

Sam Ford


Image © James Pockson
20//20 @ BGWMC
03/11/2011 - 01/12/2011
20//20 @ BGWMC was an exhibition and lecture/events series staged at Bethnal Green Working Men&#8217;s Club, London. Artists were invited to negotiate the space and history of the Club and produce work which directly responded to the location.
Download the exhibition catalogue HERE
&#8212; Performance programme &#8212;
Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn and his Orchestra - &#8216;Brown Swan&#8217;
The Three Englishmen 
John Murray  
&#8212; Lecture programme &#8212;
Alex Lifschutz - The Architecture of Community Centres
Sarah MacDougall - The Whitchapel Boys
Rachel Dickson and Emma Russell - Site-specific Commissions in Spitalfields
&#8212; Exhibiting artists &#8212;
Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn/Brenda Baxter/Jack Crisp/John Newton/Rose Rowson/MEF/Rosie Carr/James Pockson/Nash Francis/David Reynolds/Olivia Aspinall/Magdalena Strzelczak/Alex Trench

Image © James Pockson

20//20 @ BGWMC

03/11/2011 - 01/12/2011

20//20 @ BGWMC was an exhibition and lecture/events series staged at Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, London. Artists were invited to negotiate the space and history of the Club and produce work which directly responded to the location.

Download the exhibition catalogue HERE

— Performance programme —

Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn and his Orchestra - ‘Brown Swan’

The Three Englishmen 

John Murray  

— Lecture programme —

Alex Lifschutz - The Architecture of Community Centres

Sarah MacDougall - The Whitchapel Boys

Rachel Dickson and Emma Russell - Site-specific Commissions in Spitalfields

— Exhibiting artists —

Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn/Brenda Baxter/Jack Crisp/John Newton/Rose Rowson/MEF/Rosie Carr/James Pockson/Nash Francis/David Reynolds/Olivia Aspinall/Magdalena Strzelczak/Alex Trench

CLUB SINGER
MEF
Club Singer is a piece by MEF (Marianne Forrest in collaboration with Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn) commissioned by 20//20 as part of the 20//20 @ BGWMC project.  

The work is inspired by Youtube videos of club singers in venues like Bethnal Green Working Men&#8217;s Club around the country. Embracing the lo-fi aesthetic of the home video found in the club singers’ recordings and the vocal passion revealed in these amateur performances, MEF’s Club Singer celebrates the traditions of karaoke and its accompanying aesthetic.

CLUB SINGER

MEF

Club Singer is a piece by MEF (Marianne Forrest in collaboration with Pablo Navarro MacLochlainn) commissioned by 20//20 as part of the 20//20 @ BGWMC project.  

The work is inspired by Youtube videos of club singers in venues like Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club around the country. Embracing the lo-fi aesthetic of the home video found in the club singers’ recordings and the vocal passion revealed in these amateur performances, MEF’s Club Singer celebrates the traditions of karaoke and its accompanying aesthetic.

#6
SURVIVAL TACTICS OF AN ART WORLD
MEGHAN GOODEVE
At noon they made a fire, grilled bits of meat and made scrambled eggs. Terry had a famous receipe for scrambled eggs, so took off his coat and rolled up his sleeves and altogether was as portentous as an alchemist concocting the elixir of life.


Terry in triumph, always more like an occult alchemist than a mere cook, mysteriously brought off the ham and eggs. They ate rather rapidly and silently, inside the hay-loft in the almost-darkness. Stanley complained because he lost his slice of sausage. Then mysteriously they packed up and prepared for sleep. Terry of course course gave a brief exhibition of how to sleep in a hay-hut, in deep hay. One made a hole as deep as possible, and etc. etc. etc. and finally one was buried completely under three feet of hay.


And in the sunshine, with people going lazily, and women sitting in the street under their green umbrellas selling black grapes and white grapes, and pears and peaches, and the old pointed houses rearing above the narrow, sunny flagged street, and the great tower rearing up to look, like some burly but competent feudal baron, and the shadows falling so dark and the sun so very bright – why, it all had that unspeakable charm of the real old Germany, before science came, and the horrible German theorising. The lovely old Germany that roamed along, so individualistic and vigorous under its lords, but so careless, so deep with life force.


Photographs of Fulda Campsite, Kassel, with extracts from DH Lawrence’s Mr Noon, an unfinished novel set in Germany and written by Lawrence while in exile (1922). First published in1985. 
#5
PROCESS / / PROGRESS
LOTTE JOHNSON
A few months ago, I attended a discussion regarding the different “modalities” of translation that take place within the museum space, led by educator Amir Parsa. Among the numerous definitions of the term considered by Parsa, one particular strand of translation stood out to me, that performed by the curator for a public. One of the salient points that surfaced during the discussion was the selective action of curating, particularly taking place in large-scale institutions where often only works of the highest merit or from the strongest point in an artist’s career are shown. I began to think about different modes of practice, and how important (and stimulating) the early stages of an artist’s development can be. Further into this discussion, Parsa was joined by two publishers, to whom he proposed the significance and fruitfulness of exploring a work from a so-called “difficult” stage of a writer or artist’s career, a period of flux and evolution.
This proposal of exploring a work “in progress” resonated with some of my own recent thoughts, particularly in relation to the work of Tom Thayer, whose work I had seen in the Whitney Biennial in New York. Thayer himself occupied the third floor of the Whitney for two weekends, operating in the spaces where his works were displayed. The Whitney called his occupations “live performances”; to me, these afternoons were an insight into Thayer at work, engaging in a process of continual re-activation and regeneration of his own pieces. I felt as though I had stumbled into the artist’s studio, observing as Thayer moved swiftly around the space, adjusting a puppet’s flailing arms, moving a projector’s piercing beam of light, cutting and pasting pieces of paper to change the projected silhouette, pulling down a strange hanging box-construction to attach a string and then pluck at it. Another man (who I later learned was one of Thayer’s graduate students) assisted him. Acting as collaborative orchestrators, they periodically signalled to each other, exchanged materials, or communicated in low tones. It soon became impossible to distinguish separate pieces in the space, rather the body of work formed a sort of animated workshop, a collaborative whole.

Watching Thayer at work was like standing in the wings at the theatre, at once privy to the performance and its construction. His creations are multi-functional; each object that he has made is repurposed to provide the starting point or raw material for the next. Collages intended as backdrops for animations are framed on the wall, three-dimensional constructions become bizarre musical instruments. By animating his own work, he conjures abstract mythic narratives, but always leaves the skeleton of his work exposed. It seems there is no final piece. His holistic approach to his many mediums is striking, but ever more so when you watch him manipulating and activating these works in real time.
Lauren addressed related ideas in her previous blog post (see below), proposing the possibility of collaborative work in which the author’s “materials” are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, and the idea of making public the act of writing. Applying this idea to the work of practising visual artists could be equally invigorating, and Thayer provides an interesting model for the kind of expansive, evolving and transparent practice that I feel that 20//20 pursues as a curatorial collective.

#4
SOME THOUGHTS ON CURATING AND PERFORMANCE ART
RACHEL STRATTON
In late 1960’s New York, a new genre of art came into being- the performance. Defying traditional views of the artwork as a static, self contained entity; artists like Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys and Allan Kaprow began expressing themselves through durational ‘actions’ or ‘happenings’.
These physical interventions established a new relationship between artist and viewer whereby both parties were integral to the piece, each relying on the other to determine the outcome. In Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece, audience members were invited to pick up the scissors at will and snip away at the clothing on her body. No one had determined the outcome of the piece- who should volunteer or how much material to cut, so the thrill came from watching and assisting the development of the work from beginning to end.

Performance has since become central to contemporary art and has paved the way for the boom in New Media that pervades the visual arts today. Comparatively, the art of curating has developed at a more leisurely pace, only becoming subject to that same introspective, critical eye in the last decade or so.  Coming out of our recent ArchLIVE project for Agora, I want to apply the model of Performance art to the field of curating, looking at ways it can inform our understanding of the relation between 

(see Meghan’s blog entry #1)
In its traditional form the exhibition is a static entity that presents works of art in a singular narrative chosen by the curator. As the audience moves through the space, clues for interpreting the works are provided by the arrangement and any accompanying text. To consider it as a performance piece however would transform the exhibition into a dynamic environment, in which the narrative and interpretation of artworks are determined by the specific circumstances of the moment. The ArchLIVE project attempted this by continually looking to the outside world to find new ways of aiding interpretation. Each discussion held with an artist, member of the public or market seller yielded a different relationship with the artworks, all of which were noted and archived to offer people another “way in”.
In this way, the narrative of the exhibition evolves simultaneously to the audiences that pass through it, so the spectators have an impact on how the works are perceived. Rather than accepting a particular reading by one curator, they become aware of the plethora of interpretations to be made about any one artwork. The process of curating is laid bare, open for all to see, comment upon and critique. In the performance piece this primacy of “process” is key, as the audience witnesses the evolution from conception to actuality and often destruction in the course of the “happening”. Maria Abramovic, one of the original performance artists of the ‘70’s describes it thus,
“The performance you do in fixed time and in that fixed time you see the whole process and you see the disappearing of the process at the same moment and afterwards you don’t have anything, you have only the memory”
Might we not discover a different type of exhibition if we apply the same principles? Abramovic delights in the transitory nature of her work, without concern for her historic legacy. She celebrates the fact that the piece lives on only in the memories of those who witnessed it. To stage an exhibition in this way would prioritise the physical experience of being there and allow individuals to engage in a unique, highly personal dialogue that lives on through their perception of it.
I will finish with the nearest example I could think of to this form of exhibition. It comes, perhaps unsurprisingly, from Hans Ulrich Obrist. In his Do It project, he asked 168 artists to write out simple instructions for producing works of art, which he compiled in a book for general release. Since its conception in 1993, 40 different cities worldwide have staged this exhibition, each applying their own interpretation to the instructions and achieving different outcomes. To mark the twentieth anniversary of the project, Obrist is now bringing them all together in an archive of recorded information that will serve to highlight just how diverse different interpretations of the same thing can be. It puts the viewer in the position of both artist and curator, enabling them to play out their own understanding and add to the vast body of interpretations.
Obrist’s project is the first step along the way to a new type of curating that champions multiple interpretations and an active, critically engaged audience. Drawing parallels between performance and curating is just one way of exploring how we might take this further. The question then remains how to put these ideas into action and whether artists would consider it a conflict with their work?

#3
SOUND AND WOMEN - A MIX OF RESEARCH
MARIANNE FORREST
A lot of my 20//20 and personal research recently has been concerned with the portrayal of women and the &#8216;feminine&#8217; in popular media. In particular I&#8217;ve been looking into how women are presented on film and radio, and how they use these formats to present themselves. I&#8217;ve pulled together some of the sources I&#8217;ve been working with, along with some more general popular culture references, into an audio mix with accompanying &#8216;sleeve notes&#8217;. All sources and further reading can be clicked-through to in the tracklist below.

1. Margaret Thatcher - 'The Lady's not for turning' speech delivered to the Conservative party conference in Brighton on October 10, 1980. With the release of &#8216;The Iron Lady&#8217; last year suddenly conversations about whether Thatcher should be considered a feminist icon suddenly started up again. This Guardian comment piece has some views on that, along with a good dose of vitriol: And just to show that women can do anything men can do, she started a war, rode around on a tank in her headscarf, created loads more widows, thought herself terrifically grand and used the royal plural for her very own (Michelle Hanson).
2. Niko Karamyan - Meet Me at Bebe, BB (DIS Magazine) Every mall has them; meet the celebrity mallrats of LA&#8217;s famous gallerias. Post-Khardashian photo shoot of a certain type of LA femininity. Audio taken from accompanying mix by Napolian.
3. Brynn Brooks (dir.) - Women at Work, The Lesser Half (first broadcast on the BBC February 6, 1974). Taken from the BBC&#8217;s Second Wave Feminism archive, this discussion show investigates a selection of women&#8217;s attitudes towards work, the workplace and exploring &#8216;male&#8217; jobs. The mix features other clips from this archive, which is interesting not only for hearing women speak during a period so instrumental in furthering women&#8217;s rights, but also to see how the traditional modes of BBC reporting deal with these stories (often with a certain amount of disdain).
4. Grimes - Oblivion Currently the darling of music and fashion industries alike, Grimes&#8217; Claire Boucher Twitter vents her exasperation with the sex-over-substance media interest in her:

5. M.I.A. - Vikki Leekx (clip) Rob Horning writing for PopMatters highlighted M.I.A.&#8217;s struggles with privilege as part of how classic capitalist co-optation worked, making her vulnerable to anti-feminist and political character assassination, feeling that the profiler &#8220;sided at a deeper level with capitalism, marginalizing and dismissing M.I.A.’s efforts to embody the contradictions, as it were, as simple hypocrisy.&#8221; He continued &#8220;M.I.A. struggles obviously with being a sell-out&#8221; whereas the writer &#8220;has been a sell-out all along and now enforces for capitalism and the Establishment against those in the gray area. The same old story: character assassination and ad hominem attacks on the messenger&#8221; so that the message will be ignored or invalidated - (via Wikipedia) written in response to Lynn Hirschberg&#8217;s pretty damning New York Times profile of M.I.A. M.I.A. consensus often seems to be that she should be less political and more of a typical female popstar (advice here from The Vulture: 5. Keep shit-talking Lady Gaga. Remember when you said: &#8220;[My image is] not like &#8216;Haus of Gaga&#8217; &#8230; Me blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples and shit&#8221;? That was hilarious! More outspokenness directed at self-serious pop stars, and less about how Google is spying on us, would be fantastic.
6. Pussy Cat Club - reported by Bob Langley for BBC in 1970. Now a completely ridiculous feature about the Pussy Cat Club, a group of women who actively opposed women&#8217;s liberation and demanded traditional male/female roles to be upheld. 
7. TLC - No Scrubs (DJ Copy remix) One of the most successful R+B groups of the &#8217;90s and best-selling American female groups of all time. Nice example of &#8217;90s vocalisations of &#8216;independent women&#8217; But a scrub is checkin&#8217; me, But his game is kinda weak, And I know that he cannot approach me, Cuz I&#8217;m lookin&#8217; like class and he&#8217;s lookin&#8217; like trash, Can&#8217;t get wit&#8217; no deadbeat ass, So (no).
8. U1TV - Profile of a Giant - Susan B. Anthony - possibly one of the strangest radio documentaries I&#8217;ve ever come across - interesting in how boring this profile of a key player in introducing women&#8217;s suffrage in the USA is.
9. Pussy Riot - two members of this Russian anarchist-punk girl group are facing up to seven years in prison after performing a protest song in in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour of the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow in which they prayed to the Virgin Mary to get Putin out of office. Contemporary, even more politically engaged manifestation of riot grrrl movements and aesthetics of the &#8217;90s? 
10. Tonight - Equality at Cambridge University - first broadcast on the BBC February 11, 1963. Recorded at a time when Cambridge University was the only higher education institution not to allow women to take part in all its activities, the BBC produced this report interviewing female students at Birmingham University and posing the question: do you prefer feminism to femininity (or, as becomes clear through the piece, wouldn&#8217;t you rather have boys chasing after you than compete with them in academia?).  
11. Mariah Carey - Up Out My Face feat. Nicki Minaj (instrumental) - Barbie personified style of vid from one of the most successful artists of all time. Mariah and Nicki don&#8217;t put up with their man cheatin&#8217;.  


#2
IDEAS FOR A PROJECT
LAUREN BARNES
Having met Robin Baker-Gibbs and Oli Fisher as part of AGORA at Tooting Market, I’m keen to think about possible ways of working with writers on future projects. Robin and Oli’s proposal for the day was to produce texts using verbal material found in the market: letters or fiction ‘that might incorporate language taken from the market- conversation (public and private), any publications, local and national newspapers, advertisements.’ One of our aims as a collective is to facilitate and produce work that is collaborative and that utilises and interacts with settings outside the conventional gallery space, so these sorts of writing, where the author’s ‘materials’ are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, would be something really interesting for us to explore further. 
We most commonly encounter creative writing in its written form, and then in a private setting – in books, magazines or on the internet – all things that we tend to read alone, rather than together. There’s nothing wrong with these contexts, and we’re certainly interested in the possibilities of online distribution as a collective, but I think one of our main aims is to make things happen in public spaces and between people. So how do we go about exhibiting or facilitating the performance of writing? 

One option might be to make public the act of writing. Will Self participated in an interesting project called [LINK] Further up in the Air run by the organisation Urban Words in Liverpool. They invited 18 artists and writers to respond to the demolition of the Linosa Tower block, producing work in the flats. Will Self wrote a short story inspired by the block, and as he wrote he pasted each page on the wall, revealing the process of his writing. Visitors could see the work progressing as residents of the block took them on ‘open studio’ tours.
Self’s exhibition of his work-in-progress in this scenario seems to resonate with his everyday writing practice – his website has some amazing photos of his writing room, with its walls plastered in post-its recording small fragments of text. There’s definitely potential in this idea for collaborative work, in which different contributors add their own post-its to a collage-like piece of text produced by a group that could be arranged and re-arranged in different configurations.  

But these ideas rely on the writers agreeing to reveal their work before it’s deemed ‘finished’, something that not everyone is happy to do, perhaps understandably so.  
Here too, the work of the artists remains in written form. Beyond exhibiting writing, a   potentially more dynamic way of presenting the work of writers is for this work to be performed – for stories and texts to be read, or simply spoken, aloud. 
The telling and re-telling of stories in an oral tradition is a fascinating process in which a story constantly evolves as certain elements are remembered and others improvised. While written media allow texts to be recognised by their individual authors, verbally transmitted stories can be a collective enterprise where a text does not belong to one author, but instead emerges as the product of many. Perhaps there’s potential in the act of storytelling for a more fluid and engaging way of presenting the work of writers to audiences. 
Especially when working with writers whose work originates in a specific location, as in the case of Robin and Oli’s work, the performance of the work ‘in its place’ can only make our experience of it more powerful.  In this context, we could play with different ‘rules’ and structures – writers may have to perform their work from memory, without reading it, for example. The collaborative question could also be pushed further in this situation. What about a ‘Chinese whispers’ scenario in which one writer’s piece of text is taken as the starting point for that of the next writer, who must respond in the performance setting?
These are just some initial thoughts that might fuel a discussion and some further progress on these ideas. The next step is, I think, to track down some writers or artists working with words who are pursuing similar or complementary ideas… watch this space!


#1
THE ROLE OF THE CURATOR TODAY
MEGHAN GOODEVE
 
cu·ra·tor (kyoo-rey-ter, kyoor-ey- for 1, 2; kyoor-uh-ter for 3) 
noun
1. the person in charge of a museum, art collection, etc.
2. a manager; superintendent.
3.Law . a guardian of a minor, lunatic, or other incompetent, especially with regard to his or her property.
Origin: 
1325–75;  &lt; Latin,  equivalent to cūrā ( re ) to care for, attend to ( see cure) + -tor -tor;  replacing Middle English curatour  &lt; Anglo-French  &lt; Latin  as above
 
Related forms
cu·ra·to·ri·al (kyoor-uh-tawr-ee-uhl, -tohr-) adjective
cu·ra·tor·ship, noun
sub·cu·ra·tor, noun
sub·cu·ra·to·ri·al, adjective
sub·cu·ra·tor·ship, noun
 
Although art has moved outside the gallery, the framework of an audience’s reception has remained the same. The conventional role of a curator as noun, or a curator as ‘the person in charge’, is continuing even when art is being removed from gallery contexts, highlighting the need to reconsider what function a curator should have today. If art is re-contextualising itself outside the gallery, should a new relationship emerge between artist, curator and audience? Is there a need for a new approach to curating art in alternative spaces? Or, is the conventional hierarchy of curator as keeper of knowledge and the viewer/public as absorber of knowledge re-establishing itself within these new spaces of display? 
 
One example of the transition of art outside the gallery is its movement to online platforms that resist the physical boundaries of galleries. Online content is difficult to ‘manage’, and it is the manipulation of this ‘un-manageability’ by creating a space in which dialogue can build unedited that is the beauty of online projects. The most well-known examples of this today is online platforms for sharing, such as youtube or vimeo, where a visual piece is presented and the ‘audience’ comment on it, or curate their own shows through following links or adding new search topics. Although at first this seems rather arbitrary, the flexibility of an online user’s experience in comparison with the curator’s traditional control of an exhibition visitor’s experience could provide an interesting model to follow for future curatorial projects. If the spaces where art is shown, either inside or outside a gallery, could ensure the public were users rather then visitors than a model could be made where the dialogue between curator and public would be reciprocal rather than simply imparting the ‘correct’ knowledge. 
 
When discussing the emergence of this online culture, Charles Leadbeater creates a theory which he names The Art of With: ‘If the culture that the web is creating were to be reduced to a single, simple design principle it would be the principle of With. The web invites us to think and act with people, rather than for them, on their behalf or even doing things to them. The web is an invitation to connect with other people with whom we can share, exchange and create new knowledge and ideas through a process of structured lateral, free association of people and ideas. The principle underlying the web is the idea of endless, lateral connection.’ The potential of the internet for creating dialogues and connections can cause us to reconsider how art can be ‘curated’ on the internet, or to pursue this further, how art outside conventional gallery spaces can be rethought. If contemporary curatorial practice can shift its current role to a be more participatory-based, could the free association of ideas, which Leadbeater links to the internet, be created in art in new public spaces?
 
Moreover, in the same article as above, Leadbeater describes participatory contemporary artists as the ‘participatory avant-garde’, where: 
 
'Art is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. Art is not simply the result of self-expression by the artists of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The artist’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.'
 
If an artist’s role now is to ‘listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust’, so too must a curator? In fact if the above statement is altered so that ‘artist’ is replaced with ‘curator’, and ‘art’ replaced with ‘exhibition’, does this statement not hold an interesting look to the future of curating?
 
An exhibition is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. An exhibition is not simply the result of self-expression by the curators of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The curator’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.
 

#6

SURVIVAL TACTICS OF AN ART WORLD

MEGHAN GOODEVE

At noon they made a fire, grilled bits of meat and made scrambled eggs. Terry had a famous receipe for scrambled eggs, so took off his coat and rolled up his sleeves and altogether was as portentous as an alchemist concocting the elixir of life.

Terry in triumph, always more like an occult alchemist than a mere cook, mysteriously brought off the ham and eggs. They ate rather rapidly and silently, inside the hay-loft in the almost-darkness. Stanley complained because he lost his slice of sausage. Then mysteriously they packed up and prepared for sleep. Terry of course course gave a brief exhibition of how to sleep in a hay-hut, in deep hay. One made a hole as deep as possible, and etc. etc. etc. and finally one was buried completely under three feet of hay.

And in the sunshine, with people going lazily, and women sitting in the street under their green umbrellas selling black grapes and white grapes, and pears and peaches, and the old pointed houses rearing above the narrow, sunny flagged street, and the great tower rearing up to look, like some burly but competent feudal baron, and the shadows falling so dark and the sun so very bright – why, it all had that unspeakable charm of the real old Germany, before science came, and the horrible German theorising. The lovely old Germany that roamed along, so individualistic and vigorous under its lords, but so careless, so deep with life force.

Photographs of Fulda Campsite, Kassel, with extracts from DH Lawrence’s Mr Noon, an unfinished novel set in Germany and written by Lawrence while in exile (1922). First published in1985.

#5

PROCESS / / PROGRESS

LOTTE JOHNSON

A few months ago, I attended a discussion regarding the different “modalities” of translation that take place within the museum space, led by educator Amir Parsa. Among the numerous definitions of the term considered by Parsa, one particular strand of translation stood out to me, that performed by the curator for a public. One of the salient points that surfaced during the discussion was the selective action of curating, particularly taking place in large-scale institutions where often only works of the highest merit or from the strongest point in an artist’s career are shown. I began to think about different modes of practice, and how important (and stimulating) the early stages of an artist’s development can be. Further into this discussion, Parsa was joined by two publishers, to whom he proposed the significance and fruitfulness of exploring a work from a so-called “difficult” stage of a writer or artist’s career, a period of flux and evolution.

This proposal of exploring a work “in progress” resonated with some of my own recent thoughts, particularly in relation to the work of Tom Thayer, whose work I had seen in the Whitney Biennial in New York. Thayer himself occupied the third floor of the Whitney for two weekends, operating in the spaces where his works were displayed. The Whitney called his occupations “live performances”; to me, these afternoons were an insight into Thayer at work, engaging in a process of continual re-activation and regeneration of his own pieces. I felt as though I had stumbled into the artist’s studio, observing as Thayer moved swiftly around the space, adjusting a puppet’s flailing arms, moving a projector’s piercing beam of light, cutting and pasting pieces of paper to change the projected silhouette, pulling down a strange hanging box-construction to attach a string and then pluck at it. Another man (who I later learned was one of Thayer’s graduate students) assisted him. Acting as collaborative orchestrators, they periodically signalled to each other, exchanged materials, or communicated in low tones. It soon became impossible to distinguish separate pieces in the space, rather the body of work formed a sort of animated workshop, a collaborative whole.


Watching Thayer at work was like standing in the wings at the theatre, at once privy to the performance and its construction. His creations are multi-functional; each object that he has made is repurposed to provide the starting point or raw material for the next. Collages intended as backdrops for animations are framed on the wall, three-dimensional constructions become bizarre musical instruments. By animating his own work, he conjures abstract mythic narratives, but always leaves the skeleton of his work exposed. It seems there is no final piece. His holistic approach to his many mediums is striking, but ever more so when you watch him manipulating and activating these works in real time.

Lauren addressed related ideas in her previous blog post (see below), proposing the possibility of collaborative work in which the author’s “materials” are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, and the idea of making public the act of writing. Applying this idea to the work of practising visual artists could be equally invigorating, and Thayer provides an interesting model for the kind of expansive, evolving and transparent practice that I feel that 20//20 pursues as a curatorial collective.


#4

SOME THOUGHTS ON CURATING AND PERFORMANCE ART

RACHEL STRATTON

In late 1960’s New York, a new genre of art came into being- the performance. Defying traditional views of the artwork as a static, self contained entity; artists like Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys and Allan Kaprow began expressing themselves through durational ‘actions’ or ‘happenings’.

These physical interventions established a new relationship between artist and viewer whereby both parties were integral to the piece, each relying on the other to determine the outcome. In Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece, audience members were invited to pick up the scissors at will and snip away at the clothing on her body. No one had determined the outcome of the piece- who should volunteer or how much material to cut, so the thrill came from watching and assisting the development of the work from beginning to end.

Performance has since become central to contemporary art and has paved the way for the boom in New Media that pervades the visual arts today. Comparatively, the art of curating has developed at a more leisurely pace, only becoming subject to that same introspective, critical eye in the last decade or so.  Coming out of our recent ArchLIVE project for Agora, I want to apply the model of Performance art to the field of curating, looking at ways it can inform our understanding of the relation between 

(see Meghan’s blog entry #1)

In its traditional form the exhibition is a static entity that presents works of art in a singular narrative chosen by the curator. As the audience moves through the space, clues for interpreting the works are provided by the arrangement and any accompanying text. To consider it as a performance piece however would transform the exhibition into a dynamic environment, in which the narrative and interpretation of artworks are determined by the specific circumstances of the moment. The ArchLIVE project attempted this by continually looking to the outside world to find new ways of aiding interpretation. Each discussion held with an artist, member of the public or market seller yielded a different relationship with the artworks, all of which were noted and archived to offer people another “way in”.

In this way, the narrative of the exhibition evolves simultaneously to the audiences that pass through it, so the spectators have an impact on how the works are perceived. Rather than accepting a particular reading by one curator, they become aware of the plethora of interpretations to be made about any one artwork. The process of curating is laid bare, open for all to see, comment upon and critique. In the performance piece this primacy of “process” is key, as the audience witnesses the evolution from conception to actuality and often destruction in the course of the “happening”. Maria Abramovic, one of the original performance artists of the ‘70’s describes it thus,

“The performance you do in fixed time and in that fixed time you see the whole process and you see the disappearing of the process at the same moment and afterwards you don’t have anything, you have only the memory”

Might we not discover a different type of exhibition if we apply the same principles? Abramovic delights in the transitory nature of her work, without concern for her historic legacy. She celebrates the fact that the piece lives on only in the memories of those who witnessed it. To stage an exhibition in this way would prioritise the physical experience of being there and allow individuals to engage in a unique, highly personal dialogue that lives on through their perception of it.

I will finish with the nearest example I could think of to this form of exhibition. It comes, perhaps unsurprisingly, from Hans Ulrich Obrist. In his Do It project, he asked 168 artists to write out simple instructions for producing works of art, which he compiled in a book for general release. Since its conception in 1993, 40 different cities worldwide have staged this exhibition, each applying their own interpretation to the instructions and achieving different outcomes. To mark the twentieth anniversary of the project, Obrist is now bringing them all together in an archive of recorded information that will serve to highlight just how diverse different interpretations of the same thing can be. It puts the viewer in the position of both artist and curator, enabling them to play out their own understanding and add to the vast body of interpretations.

Obrist’s project is the first step along the way to a new type of curating that champions multiple interpretations and an active, critically engaged audience. Drawing parallels between performance and curating is just one way of exploring how we might take this further. The question then remains how to put these ideas into action and whether artists would consider it a conflict with their work?


#3

SOUND AND WOMEN - A MIX OF RESEARCH

MARIANNE FORREST

A lot of my 20//20 and personal research recently has been concerned with the portrayal of women and the ‘feminine’ in popular media. In particular I’ve been looking into how women are presented on film and radio, and how they use these formats to present themselves. I’ve pulled together some of the sources I’ve been working with, along with some more general popular culture references, into an audio mix with accompanying ‘sleeve notes’. All sources and further reading can be clicked-through to in the tracklist below.

1. Margaret Thatcher - 'The Lady's not for turning' speech delivered to the Conservative party conference in Brighton on October 10, 1980. With the release of ‘The Iron Lady’ last year suddenly conversations about whether Thatcher should be considered a feminist icon suddenly started up again. This Guardian comment piece has some views on that, along with a good dose of vitriol: And just to show that women can do anything men can do, she started a war, rode around on a tank in her headscarf, created loads more widows, thought herself terrifically grand and used the royal plural for her very own (Michelle Hanson).

2. Niko Karamyan - Meet Me at Bebe, BB (DIS Magazine) Every mall has them; meet the celebrity mallrats of LA’s famous gallerias. Post-Khardashian photo shoot of a certain type of LA femininity. Audio taken from accompanying mix by Napolian.

3. Brynn Brooks (dir.) - Women at Work, The Lesser Half (first broadcast on the BBC February 6, 1974). Taken from the BBC’s Second Wave Feminism archive, this discussion show investigates a selection of women’s attitudes towards work, the workplace and exploring ‘male’ jobs. The mix features other clips from this archive, which is interesting not only for hearing women speak during a period so instrumental in furthering women’s rights, but also to see how the traditional modes of BBC reporting deal with these stories (often with a certain amount of disdain).

4. Grimes - Oblivion Currently the darling of music and fashion industries alike, Grimes’ Claire Boucher Twitter vents her exasperation with the sex-over-substance media interest in her:

5. M.I.A. - Vikki Leekx (clip) Rob Horning writing for PopMatters highlighted M.I.A.’s struggles with privilege as part of how classic capitalist co-optation worked, making her vulnerable to anti-feminist and political character assassination, feeling that the profiler “sided at a deeper level with capitalism, marginalizing and dismissing M.I.A.’s efforts to embody the contradictions, as it were, as simple hypocrisy.” He continued “M.I.A. struggles obviously with being a sell-out” whereas the writer “has been a sell-out all along and now enforces for capitalism and the Establishment against those in the gray area. The same old story: character assassination and ad hominem attacks on the messenger” so that the message will be ignored or invalidated - (via Wikipedia) written in response to Lynn Hirschberg’s pretty damning New York Times profile of M.I.A. M.I.A. consensus often seems to be that she should be less political and more of a typical female popstar (advice here from The Vulture5. Keep shit-talking Lady Gaga. Remember when you said: “[My image is] not like ‘Haus of Gaga’ … Me blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples and shit”? That was hilarious! More outspokenness directed at self-serious pop stars, and less about how Google is spying on us, would be fantastic.

6. Pussy Cat Club - reported by Bob Langley for BBC in 1970. Now a completely ridiculous feature about the Pussy Cat Club, a group of women who actively opposed women’s liberation and demanded traditional male/female roles to be upheld. 

7. TLC - No Scrubs (DJ Copy remix) One of the most successful R+B groups of the ’90s and best-selling American female groups of all time. Nice example of ’90s vocalisations of ‘independent women’ But a scrub is checkin’ me, But his game is kinda weak, And I know that he cannot approach me, Cuz I’m lookin’ like class and he’s lookin’ like trash, Can’t get wit’ no deadbeat ass, So (no).

8. U1TV - Profile of a Giant - Susan B. Anthony - possibly one of the strangest radio documentaries I’ve ever come across - interesting in how boring this profile of a key player in introducing women’s suffrage in the USA is.

9. Pussy Riot - two members of this Russian anarchist-punk girl group are facing up to seven years in prison after performing a protest song in in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour of the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow in which they prayed to the Virgin Mary to get Putin out of office. Contemporary, even more politically engaged manifestation of riot grrrl movements and aesthetics of the ’90s? 

10. Tonight - Equality at Cambridge University - first broadcast on the BBC February 11, 1963. Recorded at a time when Cambridge University was the only higher education institution not to allow women to take part in all its activities, the BBC produced this report interviewing female students at Birmingham University and posing the question: do you prefer feminism to femininity (or, as becomes clear through the piece, wouldn’t you rather have boys chasing after you than compete with them in academia?).  

11. Mariah Carey - Up Out My Face feat. Nicki Minaj (instrumental) - Barbie personified style of vid from one of the most successful artists of all time. Mariah and Nicki don’t put up with their man cheatin’.  



#2

IDEAS FOR A PROJECT

LAUREN BARNES

Having met Robin Baker-Gibbs and Oli Fisher as part of AGORA at Tooting Market, I’m keen to think about possible ways of working with writers on future projects. Robin and Oli’s proposal for the day was to produce texts using verbal material found in the market: letters or fiction ‘that might incorporate language taken from the market- conversation (public and private), any publications, local and national newspapers, advertisements.’ One of our aims as a collective is to facilitate and produce work that is collaborative and that utilises and interacts with settings outside the conventional gallery space, so these sorts of writing, where the author’s ‘materials’ are gathered in the space that they find themselves in, would be something really interesting for us to explore further. 

We most commonly encounter creative writing in its written form, and then in a private setting – in books, magazines or on the internet – all things that we tend to read alone, rather than together. There’s nothing wrong with these contexts, and we’re certainly interested in the possibilities of online distribution as a collective, but I think one of our main aims is to make things happen in public spaces and between people. So how do we go about exhibiting or facilitating the performance of writing? 

One option might be to make public the act of writing. Will Self participated in an interesting project called [LINK] Further up in the Air run by the organisation Urban Words in Liverpool. They invited 18 artists and writers to respond to the demolition of the Linosa Tower block, producing work in the flats. Will Self wrote a short story inspired by the block, and as he wrote he pasted each page on the wall, revealing the process of his writing. Visitors could see the work progressing as residents of the block took them on ‘open studio’ tours.

Self’s exhibition of his work-in-progress in this scenario seems to resonate with his everyday writing practice – his website has some amazing photos of his writing room, with its walls plastered in post-its recording small fragments of text. There’s definitely potential in this idea for collaborative work, in which different contributors add their own post-its to a collage-like piece of text produced by a group that could be arranged and re-arranged in different configurations.  

But these ideas rely on the writers agreeing to reveal their work before it’s deemed ‘finished’, something that not everyone is happy to do, perhaps understandably so.  

Here too, the work of the artists remains in written form. Beyond exhibiting writing, a   potentially more dynamic way of presenting the work of writers is for this work to be performed – for stories and texts to be read, or simply spoken, aloud. 

The telling and re-telling of stories in an oral tradition is a fascinating process in which a story constantly evolves as certain elements are remembered and others improvised. While written media allow texts to be recognised by their individual authors, verbally transmitted stories can be a collective enterprise where a text does not belong to one author, but instead emerges as the product of many. Perhaps there’s potential in the act of storytelling for a more fluid and engaging way of presenting the work of writers to audiences. 

Especially when working with writers whose work originates in a specific location, as in the case of Robin and Oli’s work, the performance of the work ‘in its place’ can only make our experience of it more powerful.  In this context, we could play with different ‘rules’ and structures – writers may have to perform their work from memory, without reading it, for example. The collaborative question could also be pushed further in this situation. What about a ‘Chinese whispers’ scenario in which one writer’s piece of text is taken as the starting point for that of the next writer, who must respond in the performance setting?

These are just some initial thoughts that might fuel a discussion and some further progress on these ideas. The next step is, I think, to track down some writers or artists working with words who are pursuing similar or complementary ideas… watch this space!



#1

THE ROLE OF THE CURATOR TODAY

MEGHAN GOODEVE

 

cu·ra·tor (kyoo-rey-ter, kyoor-ey- for 1, 2; kyoor-uh-ter for 3)

noun

1. the person in charge of a museum, art collection, etc.

2. a manager; superintendent.

3.Law . a guardian of a minor, lunatic, or other incompetent, especially with regard to his or her property.

Origin:

1325–75;  < Latin,  equivalent to cūrā ( re ) to care for, attend to ( see cure) + -tor -tor;  replacing Middle English curatour  < Anglo-French  < Latin  as above

 

Related forms

cu·ra·to·ri·al (kyoor-uh-tawr-ee-uhl, -tohr-) adjective

cu·ra·tor·ship, noun

sub·cu·ra·tor, noun

sub·cu·ra·to·ri·al, adjective

sub·cu·ra·tor·ship, noun

 

Although art has moved outside the gallery, the framework of an audience’s reception has remained the same. The conventional role of a curator as noun, or a curator as ‘the person in charge’, is continuing even when art is being removed from gallery contexts, highlighting the need to reconsider what function a curator should have today. If art is re-contextualising itself outside the gallery, should a new relationship emerge between artist, curator and audience? Is there a need for a new approach to curating art in alternative spaces? Or, is the conventional hierarchy of curator as keeper of knowledge and the viewer/public as absorber of knowledge re-establishing itself within these new spaces of display?

 

One example of the transition of art outside the gallery is its movement to online platforms that resist the physical boundaries of galleries. Online content is difficult to ‘manage’, and it is the manipulation of this ‘un-manageability’ by creating a space in which dialogue can build unedited that is the beauty of online projects. The most well-known examples of this today is online platforms for sharing, such as youtube or vimeo, where a visual piece is presented and the ‘audience’ comment on it, or curate their own shows through following links or adding new search topics. Although at first this seems rather arbitrary, the flexibility of an online user’s experience in comparison with the curator’s traditional control of an exhibition visitor’s experience could provide an interesting model to follow for future curatorial projects. If the spaces where art is shown, either inside or outside a gallery, could ensure the public were users rather then visitors than a model could be made where the dialogue between curator and public would be reciprocal rather than simply imparting the ‘correct’ knowledge.

 

When discussing the emergence of this online culture, Charles Leadbeater creates a theory which he names The Art of With: ‘If the culture that the web is creating were to be reduced to a single, simple design principle it would be the principle of With. The web invites us to think and act with people, rather than for them, on their behalf or even doing things to them. The web is an invitation to connect with other people with whom we can share, exchange and create new knowledge and ideas through a process of structured lateral, free association of people and ideas. The principle underlying the web is the idea of endless, lateral connection.’ The potential of the internet for creating dialogues and connections can cause us to reconsider how art can be ‘curated’ on the internet, or to pursue this further, how art outside conventional gallery spaces can be rethought. If contemporary curatorial practice can shift its current role to a be more participatory-based, could the free association of ideas, which Leadbeater links to the internet, be created in art in new public spaces?

 

Moreover, in the same article as above, Leadbeater describes participatory contemporary artists as the ‘participatory avant-garde’, where:

 

'Art is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. Art is not simply the result of self-expression by the artists of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The artist’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.'

 

If an artist’s role now is to ‘listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust’, so too must a curator? In fact if the above statement is altered so that ‘artist’ is replaced with ‘curator’, and ‘art’ replaced with ‘exhibition’, does this statement not hold an interesting look to the future of curating?

 

An exhibition is not embodied in an object but lies in the encounter between the art and the audience, and among the audience themselves. An exhibition is not simply the result of self-expression by the curators of a preconceived idea but the result of communication with the audience and other partners in the process. The curator’s role is not just to proclaim but to listen, interpret, incorporate ideas and adjust.

 

About:

20//20 is an artistic and curatorial collective with a focus on creating collaborative exchanges in contemporary art outside conventional gallery spaces. The work of the Collective seeks to generate a variety of modes of practice including artwork, exhibition, publication and debate.

Contact:
20.20collective@gmail.com
@2020collective